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New Genetics and Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis Study Results from Nemours Biomedical Research Described (The Role of Transforming Growth Factor beta...

July 14, 2014



New Genetics and Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis Study Results from Nemours Biomedical Research Described (The Role of Transforming Growth Factor beta Signaling in Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes From Patients With Oligoarticular Juvenile Idiopathic ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Business Week -- Investigators publish new report on Rheumatoid Arthritis. According to news reporting out of Wilmington, Delaware, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "This study was designed to investigate the pathogenic contributions of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) to juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) by identifying pathways with dysregulated gene expression in FLS from patients with oligoarticular JIA. FLS were derived from synovial fluid obtained by arthrocentesis from patients with JIA undergoing intraarticular steroid injections and from orthopedic control patients."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Nemours Biomedical Research, "Gene expression profiles of the JIA and control FLS were obtained using the Affymetrix platform, with application of Ingenuity Path-way Analysis and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis software to define gene sets in dysregulated pathways and networks of potential pathologic relevance in this disease. Biologically relevant differentially expressed genes were confirmed by RNA and protein analysis. Exploration of global gene expression profiles of the JIA FLS revealed important dysregulated pathways, including the transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) signaling, as well as endochondral bone formation, cartilage formation, and beta-catenin networks. Importantly, bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) was significantly overexpressed in the JIA FLS. FLS from patients with oligoarticular JIA exhibit a chondrocyte phenotype, as evidenced by expression of type II collagen and aggrecan. Dysregulation of the pathways involved in the pathogenesis of oligoarticular JIA were revealed through gene expression profiling. JIA FLS displayed dysregulated TGF beta signaling and exhibited a hypertrophic chondrocyte phenotype. These characteristics, along with contributions from the beta-catenin network may have implications for endochondral bone formation and local growth disturbances in oligoarticular JIA."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Overexpression of BMP-4 in FLS from patients with oligoarticular JIA in particular may play an important role in disease pathogenesis, with a direct effect on functional outcome and with implications for future treatment."

For more information on this research see: The Role of Transforming Growth Factor beta Signaling in Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes From Patients With Oligoarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Dysregulation of Transforming Growth Factor beta Signaling, Including Overexpression of Bone Morphog. Arthritis & Rheumatology, 2014;66(5):1352-1362. Arthritis & Rheumatology can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA (see also Rheumatoid Arthritis).

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A.C. Brescia, Nemours Biomed Res, Wilmington, DE, United States. Additional authors for this research include M.M. Simonds, S.M. McCahan, P.T. Fawcett and C.D. Rose.

Keywords for this news article include: Delaware, Genetics, Cytokines, Wilmington, Fibroblasts, United States, Bone Research, Joint Diseases, Musculoskeletal Diseases, North and Central America, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, TGF-beta Superfamily Proteins, Transforming Growth Factor beta

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Business Week


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