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New Breast Cancer Data Have Been Reported by Investigators at Duke University (Relationship between exercise behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness, and...

July 17, 2014



New Breast Cancer Data Have Been Reported by Investigators at Duke University (Relationship between exercise behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness, and cognitive function in early breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin-containing ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Women's Health Weekly -- New research on Oncology is the subject of a report. According to news reporting out of Durham, North Carolina, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between self-reported exercise behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and cognitive function in early breast cancer patients. Thirty-seven breast cancer patients following completion of chemotherapy (median 16 months) and 14 controls were studied."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Duke University, "Cognitive function was assessed using the Central Nervous System (CNS) Vital Signs software (CNS Vital Signs, LLC, Morrisville, N. C., USA), a computerized test battery consisting of 9 cognitive subtests. Exercise behavior was evaluated using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire, and CRF was assessed via a cardiopulmonary exercise test to assess peak oxygen consumption. Patients' mean total exercise was 184 +/- 141 min center dot week(-1) compared with 442 +/- 315 min center dot week(-1) in controls (p < 0.001). Significantly fewer patients (32%) were meeting exercise guidelines (i.e., >= 150 min of moderate-intensity or vigorous exercise per week) compared with 57% of controls (p = 0.014). Patients' peak oxygen consumption averaged 23.5 +/- 6.3 mL center dot kg(-1)center dot min(-1) compared with 30.6 +/- 7.0 mL center dot kg(-1)center dot min(-1) in controls (p < 0.01). Scores on the cognitive subdomains were generally lower in patients compared with controls, although only the difference in verbal memory was significant (unadjusted p = 0.041). In patients, weak to moderate correlations were indicated between exercise, peak oxygen consumption, and the majority of cognitive subdomain scores; however, there was a significant positive correlation between exercise and visual memory (r = 0.47, p = 0.004)."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Breast cancer patients following the completion of primary adjuvant chemotherapy exhibit, in general, worse cognitive performance than healthy women from the general population, and such performance may be related to their level of exercise behavior."

For more information on this research see: Relationship between exercise behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness, and cognitive function in early breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy: a pilot study. Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism-Physiologie Appliquee Nutrition Et Metabolisme, 2014;39(6):724-729. Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism-Physiologie Appliquee Nutrition Et Metabolisme can be contacted at: Canadian Science Publishing, Nrc Research Press, 65 Auriga Dr, Suite 203, Ottawa, On K2E 7W6, Canada (see also Oncology).

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting T. Crowgey, Duke University, Dept. of Psychol & Neurosci, Durham, NC 27710, United States. Additional authors for this research include K.B. Peters, W.E. Hornsby, A. Lane, F. McSherry, J.E. Herndon, M.J. West, C.L. Williams and L.W. Jones.

Keywords for this news article include: Drugs, Durham, Oncology, Chemotherapy, United States, Breast Cancer, North Carolina, Women's Health, Central Nervous System, North and Central America, Clinical Trials and Studies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Women's Health Weekly


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