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Findings on Stem Cells Detailed by Investigators at University of Michigan (Comparison of Uncultured Marrow Mononuclear Cells and Culture-Expanded...

July 16, 2014



Findings on Stem Cells Detailed by Investigators at University of Michigan (Comparison of Uncultured Marrow Mononuclear Cells and Culture-Expanded Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Collagen-Chitosan Microbeads for Orthopedic Tissue Engineering)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Research findings on Stem Cell Research are discussed in a new report. According to news originating from Ann Arbor, Michigan, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Stem cell-based therapies have shown promise in enhancing repair of bone and cartilage. Marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are typically expanded in vitro to increase cell number, but this process is lengthy, costly, and there is a risk of contamination and altered cellular properties."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Michigan, "Potential advantages of using fresh uncultured bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) include heterotypic cell and paracrine interactions between MSC and other marrow-derived cells including hematopoietic, endothelial, and other progenitor cells. In the present study, we compared the osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of freshly isolated BMMC to that of cultured-expanded MSC, when encapsulated in three-dimensional (3D) collagen-chitosan microbeads. The effect of low and high oxygen tension on cell function and differentiation into orthopedic lineages was also examined. Freshly isolated rat BMMC (25 x 10(6) cells/mL, containing an estimated 5 x 10(4) MSC/mL) or purified and culture-expanded rat bone marrow-derived MSC (2 x 10(5) cells/mL) were added to a 65-35 wt% collagen-chitosan hydrogel mixture and fabricated into 3D microbeads by emulsification and thermal gelation. Microbeads were cultured in control MSC growth media in either 20% O-2 (normoxia) or 5% O-2 (hypoxia) for an initial 3 days, and then in control, osteogenic, or chondrogenic media for an additional 21 days. Microbead preparations were evaluated for viability, total DNA content, calcium deposition, and osteocalcin and sulfated glycosaminoglycan expression, and they were examined histologically. Hypoxia enhanced initial progenitor cell survival in fresh BMMC-microbeads, but it did not enhance osteogenic potential. Fresh uncultured BMMC-microbeads showed a similar degree of osteogenesis as culture-expanded MSC-microbeads, even though they initially contained only 1/10th the number of MSC. Chondrogenic differentiation was not strongly supported in any of the microbead formulations."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This study demonstrates the microbead-based approach to culturing and delivering cells for tissue regeneration, and suggests that fresh BMMC may be an alternative to using cultureexpanded MSC for bone tissue engineering."

For more information on this research see: Comparison of Uncultured Marrow Mononuclear Cells and Culture-Expanded Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Collagen-Chitosan Microbeads for Orthopedic Tissue Engineering. Tissue Engineering Part A, 2014;20(1-2):210-224. Tissue Engineering Part A can be contacted at: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc, 140 Huguenot Street, 3RD Fl, New Rochelle, NY 10801, USA (see also Stem Cell Research).

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from J.K. Wise, University of Michigan, Dept. of Orthoped Surg, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. Additional authors for this research include A.I. Alford, S.A. Goldstein and J.P. Stegemann.

Keywords for this news article include: Tissue Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Biomedicine, Michigan, Collagen, Ann Arbor, Bone Marrow, United States, Bone Research, Immune System, Bioengineering, Stem Cell Research, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, North and Central America, Extracellular Matrix Proteins

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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