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Findings on Biomaterials Reported by Researchers at Stanford University (Spatial patterning of endothelium modulates cell morphology, adhesiveness...

July 18, 2014



Findings on Biomaterials Reported by Researchers at Stanford University (Spatial patterning of endothelium modulates cell morphology, adhesiveness and transcriptional signature)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- A new study on Biomaterials is now available. According to news reporting originating in Stanford, California, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Microscale and nanoscale structures can spatially pattern endothelial cells (ECs) into parallel-aligned organization, mimicking their cellular alignment in blood vessels exposed to laminar shear stress. However, the effects of spatial patterning on the function and global transcriptome of ECs are incompletely characterized."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Stanford University, "We used both parallel-aligned micropatterned and nanopatterned biomaterials to evaluate the effects of spatial patterning on the phenotype of ECs, based on gene expression profiling, functional characterization of monocyte adhesion, and quantification of cellular morphology. We demonstrate that both micropatterned and aligned nanofibrillar biomaterials could effectively guide EC organization along the direction of the micropatterned channels or nanofibrils, respectively. The ability of ECs to sense spatial patterning cues were abrogated in the presence of cytoskeletal disruption agents. Moreover, both micropatterned and aligned nanofibrillar substrates promoted an athero-resistant EC phenotype by reducing endothelial adhesiveness for monocytes and platelets, as well as by downregulating the expression of adhesion proteins and chemokines. We further found that micropatterned ECs have a transcriptional signature that is unique from non-patterned ECs, as well as from ECs aligned by shear stress."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "These findings highlight the importance of spatial patterning cues in guiding EC organization and function, which may have clinical relevance in the development of vascular grafts that promote patency."

For more information on this research see: Spatial patterning of endothelium modulates cell morphology, adhesiveness and transcriptional signature. Biomaterials, 2013;34(12):2928-37. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biomaterials - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/30392)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting N.F. Huang, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States. Additional authors for this research include E.S. Lai, A.J. Ribeiro, S. Pan, B.L. Pruitt, G.G. Fuller and J.P Cooke (see also Biomaterials).

Keywords for this news article include: Stanford, Angiology, California, Endothelium, Biomaterials, United States, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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