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Findings from Zhejiang University Provides New Data about Lymphoid Tissue (Mussel-inspired polydopamine: a biocompatible and ultrastable coating for...

July 18, 2014



Findings from Zhejiang University Provides New Data about Lymphoid Tissue (Mussel-inspired polydopamine: a biocompatible and ultrastable coating for nanoparticles in vivo)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Researchers detail new data in Lymphoid Tissue. According to news reporting from Hangzhou, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) has served as a universal coating to nanoparticles (NPs) for various biomedical applications. However, one remaining critical question is whether the PDA shell on NPs is stable in vivo."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Zhejiang University, "In this study, we modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with finely controlled PDA nanolayers to form uniform core/shell nanostructures (GNP@PDA). In vitro study showed that the PDA-coated GNPs had low cytotoxicity and could smoothly translocate to cancer cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis demonstrated that the PDA nanoshells were intact within cells after 24 h incubation. Notably, we found the GNP@PDA could partially escape from the endosomes/lysosomes to cytosol and locate close to the nucleus. Furthermore, we observed that the PDA-coated NPs have very different uptake behavior in two important organs of the liver and spleen: GNP@PDA in the liver were mainly uptaken by the Kupffer cells, while the GNP@PDA in the spleen were uptaken by a variety of cells. Importantly, we proved the PDA nanoshells were stable within cells of the liver and spleen for at least six weeks, and GNP@PDA did not show notable histological toxicity to main organs of mice in a long time."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "These results provided the direct evidence to support that the PDA surface modification can serve as an effective strategy to form ultrastable coatings on NPs in vivo, which can improve the intracellular delivery capacity and biocompatibility of NPs for biomedical application."

For more information on this research see: Mussel-inspired polydopamine: a biocompatible and ultrastable coating for nanoparticles in vivo. Acs Nano, 2013;7(10):9384-95. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Acs Nano - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/ancac3)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting X. Liu, MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University , Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include J. Cao, H. Li, J. Li, Q. Jin, K. Ren and J. Ji (see also Lymphoid Tissue).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Spleen, Hangzhou, Nanoparticle, Nanotechnology, Lymphoid Tissue, Emerging Technologies, Hemic and Immune Systems, People's Republic of China.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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