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Findings from University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) Broaden Understanding of Cancer Gene Therapy (PDCD2 functions in cancer cell...

July 14, 2014



Findings from University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) Broaden Understanding of Cancer Gene Therapy (PDCD2 functions in cancer cell proliferation and predicts relapsed leukemia)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Gene Therapy Week -- Fresh data on Biotechnology are presented in a new report. According to news reporting originating from New Brunswick, New Jersey, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "PDCD2 is an evolutionarily conserved eukaryotic protein with unknown function. The Drosophlia PDCD2 ortholog Zfrp8 has an essential function in fly hematopoiesis."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), "Zfrp8 mutants exhibit marked lymph gland hyperplasia that results from increased proliferation of partially differentiated hemocytes, suggesting Zfrp8 may participate in cell growth. Based on the above observations we have focused on the role of PDCD2 in human cancer cell proliferation and hypothesized that aberrant PDCD2 expression may be characteristic of human malignancies. We report that PDCD2 is highly expressed in human acute leukemia cells as well as in normal hematopoietic progenitors. PDCD2 knockdown in cancer cells impairs their proliferation, but not viability relative to parental cells, supporting the notion that PDCD2 overexpression facilitates cancer cell growth. Prospective analysis of PDCD2 in acute leukemia patients indicates PDCD2 RNA expression correlates with disease status and is a significant predictor of clinical relapse."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "PDCD2's role in cell proliferation and its high expression in human malignancies make it an attractive, novel potential molecular target for new anti-cancer therapies."

For more information on this research see: PDCD2 functions in cancer cell proliferation and predicts relapsed leukemia. Cancer Biology & Therapy, 2013;14(6):546-55 (see also Biotechnology).

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting N. Barboza, University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, United States. Additional authors for this research include S. Minakhina, D.J. Medina, B. Balsara, S. Greenwood, L. Huzzy, A.B. Rabson, R. Steward and D.G Schaar.

Keywords for this news article include: Biotechnology, Oncology, New Jersey, Hematology, New Brunswick, United States, Cell Proliferation, Cancer Gene Therapy, Leukemia Gene Therapy, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Cancer Gene Therapy Week


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