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Findings from University of Bologna Broadens Understanding of DNA Research (A practical approach for the detection of DNA nanostructures in single...

July 15, 2014



Findings from University of Bologna Broadens Understanding of DNA Research (A practical approach for the detection of DNA nanostructures in single live human cells by fluorescence microscopy)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators discuss new findings in DNA Research. According to news reporting originating in Bologna, Italy, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "In the last decade, in vivo studies have revealed that even subtle differences in size, concentration of components, cell cycle stage, make the cells in a population respond differently to the same stimulus. In order to characterize such complexity of behavior and shed more light on the functioning and communication amongst cells, researchers are developing strategies to study single live cells in a population."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Bologna, "In this paper, we describe the methods to design and prepare DNA-based fluorescent tetrahedral nanostructures, to deliver them to live cells and characterize such cells with epifluorescence microscopy. We report that HeLa cells internalize these nanostructures spontaneously with a higher efficiency with respect to single-stranded or double-stranded oligonucleotides."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Our findings suggest that DNA tetrahedra could serve as a platform for the realization of a series of multifunctional intracellular biosensors for the analysis of single live cells."

For more information on this research see: A practical approach for the detection of DNA nanostructures in single live human cells by fluorescence microscopy. Methods, 2014;67(2):185-92. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Methods - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/622914)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting C. Bergamini, Interdepartmental Center for Industrial Research, Health Sciences & Technologies (CIRI-HST) at the University of Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 41, E, Ozzano dell'Emilia, Bologna 40064, Italy. Additional authors for this research include P. Angelini, K.J. Rhoden, A.M. Porcelli, R. Fato and G. Zuccheri (see also DNA Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Italy, Europe, Bologna, DNA Research.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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