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Findings from Stony Brook University Provide New Insights into Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering (Evaluation of shear-induced platelet...

July 16, 2014



Findings from Stony Brook University Provide New Insights into Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering (Evaluation of shear-induced platelet activation models under constant and dynamic shear stress loading conditions relevant to devices)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Biotechnology. According to news reporting originating from Stony Brook, New York, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The advent of implantable blood-recirculating devices such as left ventricular assist devices and prosthetic heart valves provides a viable therapy for patients with end-stage heart failure and valvular disease. However, device-generated pathological flow patterns result in thromboembolic complications that require complex and lifelong anticoagulant therapy, which entails hemorrhagic risks and is not appropriate for certain patients."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Stony Brook University, "Optimizing the thrombogenic performance of such devices utilizing numerical simulations requires the development of predictive platelet activation models that account for variations in shear-loading rates characterizing blood flow through such devices. Platelets were exposed in vitro to both dynamic and constant shear stress conditions emulating those found in blood-recirculating devices in order to determine their shear-induced activation and sensitization response. Both these behaviors were found to be dependent on the shear loading rates, in addition to shear stress magnitude and exposure time. We then critically examined several current models and evaluated their predictive capabilities using these results. Shear loading rate terms were then included to account for dynamic aspects that are either ignored or partially considered by these models, and model parameters were optimized. Independent optimization for each of the two types of shear stress exposure conditions tested resulted in different sets of best-fit constants, indicating that universal optimization may not be possible."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Inherent limitations of the current models require a paradigm shift from these integral-based discretized power law models to better address the dynamic conditions encountered in blood-recirculating devices."

For more information on this research see: Evaluation of shear-induced platelet activation models under constant and dynamic shear stress loading conditions relevant to devices. Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 2013;41(6):1279-96. Annals of Biomedical Engineering can be contacted at: Springer, 233 Spring Street, New York, NY 10013, USA. (Springer - www.springer.com; Annals of Biomedical Engineering - www.springerlink.com/content/0090-6964/)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J. Sheriff, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, T15-090 Health Sciences Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8151, United States. Additional authors for this research include J.S. Soares, M. Xenos, J. Jesty, M.J. Slepian and D. Bluestein (see also Biotechnology).

Publisher contact information for the journal Annals of Biomedical Engineering is: Springer, 233 Spring Street, New York, NY 10013, USA.

Keywords for this news article include: Biotechnology, New York, Stony Brook, United States, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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