News Column

"Determining Image Alignment Failure" in Patent Application Approval Process

July 15, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Information Technology Newsweekly -- A patent application by the inventor Geiss, Ryan (San Jose, CA), filed on December 20, 2012, was made available online on July 3, 2014, according to news reporting originating from Washington, D.C., by VerticalNews correspondents.

This patent application is assigned to Google Inc.

The following quote was obtained by the news editors from the background information supplied by the inventors: "Generally, imaging may refer to representing the color and brightness characteristics of digital images. Low dynamic range (LDR) imaging may represent digital images (e.g., photographs and motion video) with 8 or fewer bits for each color channel of a pixel. As a result, up to 256 levels of brightness may be supported. Currently, a wide range of video output devices (e.g., computer monitors, tablet and smartphone screens, televisions, etc.) support displaying LDR images.

"However, real-world scenes often exhibit a wider range of brightness than can be represented by LDR imaging. As an example scene with a wide brightness range, consider an individual standing in a dark room in front of a window. This scene may include both extremely bright regions (e.g., sunlit features outside the window) and extremely dark regions (e.g., the features in the room). Ideally, a photograph of this scene would include both the details in the bright regions and the details in the dark regions."

In addition to the background information obtained for this patent application, VerticalNews journalists also obtained the inventor's summary information for this patent application: "In a first example embodiment, a first set of pixels of a short exposure image and a second set of pixels of a long exposure image may be obtained. The short exposure image may have been captured using a short total exposure time (TET) and the long exposure image may have been captured using a long TET. The long TET may be greater than the short TET. The first set of pixels and the second set of pixels may be aligned. A first pixel value of a first pixel in the first set of pixels and a second pixel of a second pixel in the second set of pixels value may be compared. Based on the comparison, an alignment error value for the first pixel and the second pixel may be determined. Based on at least the alignment error value, an output image may be provided.

"A second example embodiment may include a non-transitory computer-readable storage medium, having stored thereon program instructions that, upon execution by a computing device, cause the computing device, and/or its peripherals, to perform operations in accordance with the first example embodiment.

"A third example embodiment may include a computing device, comprising at least a processor and data storage. The data storage may contain program instructions that, upon execution by the processor, cause the computing device operate in accordance with the first example embodiment.

"These as well as other aspects, advantages, and alternatives will become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art by reading the following detailed description with reference where appropriate to the accompanying drawings. Further, it should be understood that the description provided in this summary section and elsewhere in this document is intended to illustrate the claimed subject matter by way of example and not by way of limitation.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

"FIG. 1 depicts front, right side, and rear views of a digital camera device, in accordance with an example embodiment.

"FIG. 2 depicts a block diagram of a computing device with image capture capability, in accordance with an example embodiment.

"FIG. 3 depicts a flow chart, in accordance with an example embodiment.

"FIG. 4 depicts image alignment, in accordance with an example embodiment.

"FIG. 5 depicts a flow chart, in accordance with an example embodiment."

URL and more information on this patent application, see: Geiss, Ryan. Determining Image Alignment Failure. Filed December 20, 2012 and posted July 3, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=5306&p=107&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140626.PD.&OS=PD/20140626&RS=PD/20140626

Keywords for this news article include: Google Inc., Information Technology, Information and Data Storage.

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Source: Information Technology Newsweekly


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