News Column

Patent Issued for Scanning Orders in Inversion Schemes of Displays

August 5, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Technology -- According to news reporting originating from Alexandria, Virginia, by VerticalNews journalists, a patent by the inventors Bae, Hopil (Sunnyvale, CA); Ge, Zhibing (Sunnyvale, CA), filed on May 24, 2011, was published online on July 22, 2014.

The assignee for this patent, patent number 8786586, is Apple Inc. (Cupertino, CA).

Reporters obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "Display screens of various types of technologies, such as liquid crystal displays (LCDs), organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays, etc., can be used as screens or displays for a wide variety of electronic devices, including such consumer electronics as televisions, computers, and handheld devices (e.g., cellular telephones, audio and video players, gaming systems, and so forth). LCD devices, for example, typically provide a flat display in a relatively thin package that is suitable for use in a variety of electronic goods. In addition, LCD devices typically use less power than comparable display technologies, making them suitable for use in battery-powered devices or in other contexts where it is desirable to minimize power usage.

"LCD devices typically include multiple picture elements (pixels) arranged in a matrix. The pixels may be driven by scanning line and data line circuitry to display an image on the display that can be periodically refreshed over multiple image frames such that a continuous image may be perceived by a user. Individual pixels of an LCD device can permit a variable amount light from a backlight to pass through the pixel based on the strength of an electric field applied to the liquid crystal material of the pixel. The electric field can be generated by a difference in potential of two electrodes, a common electrode and a pixel electrode. In some LCDs, such as electrically-controlled birefringence (ECB) LCDs, the liquid crystal can be in between the two electrodes. In other LCDs, such as in-plane switching (IPS) and fringe-field switching (EPS) LCDs, the two electrodes can be positioned on the same side of the liquid crystal. In many displays, the direction of the electric field generated by the two electrodes can be reversed periodically. For example, LCD displays can scan the pixels using various inversion schemes, in which the polarities of the voltages applied to the common electrodes and the pixel electrodes can be periodically switched, i.e., from positive to negative, or from negative to positive. As a result, the polarities of the voltages applied to various lines in a display panel, such as data lines used to charge the pixel electrodes to a target voltage, can be periodically switched according to the particular inversion scheme."

In addition to obtaining background information on this patent, VerticalNews editors also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent: "The following description includes examples of scanning lines (e.g., rows) of sub-pixels of a display screen by applying voltages to pixel electrodes of adjacent sub-pixels in different lines such that polarity changes in opposite directions can occur in two sub-pixels that are adjacent to a particular sub-pixel. For example, a positive-polarity voltage can be applied to the pixel electrode of one sub-pixel that is adjacent to a particular sub-pixel. The application of positive-polarity voltage can swing the polarity of the pixel electrode from negative to positive, i.e., a positive direction change. A negative-polarity voltage can be applied to another sub-pixel that is adjacent to the particular sub-pixel, swinging the polarity of the pixel electrode from positive to negative, i.e., a negative direction change. In this way, for example, a change in brightness of the particular sub-pixel that may result from a voltage swing one direction in an adjacent sub-pixel may be offset by a change in brightness of the particular sub-pixel that may result from a voltage swing in another adjacent sub-pixel."

For more information, see this patent: Bae, Hopil; Ge, Zhibing. Scanning Orders in Inversion Schemes of Displays. U.S. Patent Number 8786586, filed May 24, 2011, and published online on July 22, 2014. Patent URL: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8786586.PN.&OS=PN/8786586RS=PN/8786586

Keywords for this news article include: Apple Inc., Technology.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Journal of Technology


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