News Column

Patent Issued for Pressure Release Systems, Apparatus and Methods

August 5, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Technology -- According to news reporting originating from Alexandria, Virginia, by VerticalNews journalists, a patent by the inventors Newman, Jr., Lionel (Los Angeles, CA), filed on February 4, 2010, was published online on July 22, 2014.

The assignee for this patent, patent number 8783247, is Wet Nose Technologies, LLC. (Los Angeles, CA).

Reporters obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "I. Field

"The present invention relates to pressure release systems and apparatus, in general, and pressure release systems and apparatus for respiratory circuits, in particular.

"II. Background

"Respiratory circuits are typically employed to transport a gas to or from the respiratory system of a patient. In some cases, due to machine malfunction, kinking of tubing in the respiratory circuit and/or error by the healthcare professional, the patient can be provided a gas at a pressure that is too high. Excessive pressures can endanger the respiratory systems of patients, potentially causing lung ruptures and other serious medical conditions.

"Additionally, in many cases, healthcare professionals provide care to more than one patient during a work shift. Accordingly, the healthcare professional cannot be aware of the pressure experienced by a patient at any particular instant of time. Therefore, a gas of an excessive pressure can be provided to the patient for an unacceptable period of time before the problem is noticed and addressed by the professional.

"Accordingly, there is a desire for systems and apparatus that detect and relieve excessive pressure in respiratory circuits, and provide an audible alert of the excessive pressure in the respiratory circuits.

"Typically pressure detection apparatus are large and heavy weight and therefore provided on a support base with humidifiers, temperature gauges, gas blenders, gas sources and other components for providing gas to and monitoring of a patient, as opposed to being provided inline in the circuit and close to the patient. In typical embodiments, the respiratory circuit, from the location of the pressure detection device to the patient and/or the length of the tubing coupling the pressure detection device to the patient, can be four to five feet long. Accordingly, the systems often do not provide accurate pressure detection near the patient, resulting in a high likelihood of undetected overpressure at the patient and/or are of such a large size that the conventional systems pose a danger of snagging a patient or healthcare professional or the fabric or clothing of the patient or healthcare professional.

"Accordingly, there is a desire for lightweight, small systems and apparatus that detect and relieve excessive pressure in respiratory circuits, provide an audible alert of the excessive pressure in the respiratory circuits and/or are placed inline in the respiratory circuit at a location that is proximal to the patient."

In addition to obtaining background information on this patent, VerticalNews editors also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent: "In one embodiment, a respiratory circuit is provided. The respiratory circuit can include: an adapter having a plurality of connectors of two or more different internal or outer diameters; and a pressure release valve configured to emanate sound if a pressure of a gas received at the pressure release valve is greater than or equal to an activation pressure of the pressure release valve, the pressure release valve also being formed with a body portion configured and having a first end of the body portion coupled to one of the plurality of connectors of the adapter, wherein the pressure release valve is coupled inline in the respiratory circuit via the adapter and in close proximity to a patient location.

"In another embodiment, a respiratory circuit apparatus is provided. The respiratory circuit apparatus can include: a pressure release valve configured to emanate sound if a pressure of a gas received at the pressure release valve is greater than or equal to an activation pressure of the pressure release valve, the pressure release valve also being formed with a body portion configured and having a first end of the body portion coupleable to one of a plurality of connectors of an adapter configured to be positioned inline in a respiratory circuit.

"In another embodiment, a respiratory circuit pressure release system is provided. The respiratory circuit pressure release system can include: a respiratory circuit adaptable pressure release valve configured with at least one port dimensioned to be coupled to an adapter having a plurality of adapter ports for coupling the adapter and one or more mounted devices to the respiratory circuit, wherein the respiratory circuit adaptable pressure release valve is coupleable in series in the respiratory circuit via the adapter, and wherein the respiratory circuit adaptable pressure release valve is configured to whistle if a pressure of a gas received at the respiratory circuit adaptable pressure release valve is greater than or equal to an activation pressure of the respiratory circuit adaptable pressure release valve."

For more information, see this patent: Newman, Jr., Lionel. Pressure Release Systems, Apparatus and Methods. U.S. Patent Number 8783247, filed February 4, 2010, and published online on July 22, 2014. Patent URL: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8783247.PN.&OS=PN/8783247RS=PN/8783247

Keywords for this news article include: Wet Nose Technologies LLC.

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Source: Journal of Technology


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