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Studies from University Health Network Add New Findings in the Area of Xenografts (Investigating the Impact of Nanoparticle Size on Active and...

August 6, 2014



Studies from University Health Network Add New Findings in the Area of Xenografts (Investigating the Impact of Nanoparticle Size on Active and Passive Tumor Targeting Efficiency)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- A new study on Biotechnology is now available. According to news reporting from Toronto, Canada, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Understanding the principles governing the design of nanopartides for tumor targeting is essential for the effective diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors. There is currently a poor understanding of how to rationally engineer nanoparticles for tumor targeting."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from University Health Network, "Here, we engineered different-sized spherical gold nanoparticles to discern the effect of particle diameter on passive (poly(ethylene glycol)-coated) and active (transferrin-coated) targeting of MDA-MB-435 orthotopic tumor xenografts. Tumor accumulation of actively targeted nanoparticles was found to be 5 times faster and approximately 2-fold higher relative to their passive counterparts within the 60 nm diameter range. For 15,30, and 100 nm, we observed no significant differences. We hypothesize that such enhancements are the result of an increased capacity to penetrate into tumors and preferentially associate with cancer cells. We also use computational modeling to explore the mechanistic parameters that can impact tumor accumulation efficacy. We demonstrate that tumor accumulation can be mediated by high nanoparticle avidity and are weakly dependent on their plasma clearance rate. Such findings suggest that empirical models can be used to rapidly screen novel nanomaterials for relative differences in tumor targeting without the need for animal work."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Although our findings are specific to MDA-MB-435 tumor xenografts, our experimental and computational findings help to enrich knowledge of design considerations that will aid in the optimal engineering of spherical gold nanoparticles for cancer applications in the future."

For more information on this research see: Investigating the Impact of Nanoparticle Size on Active and Passive Tumor Targeting Efficiency. ACS Nano, 2014;8(6):5696-5706. ACS Nano can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; ACS Nano - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/ancac3)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting E.A. Sykes, Univ Hlth Network, Ontario Canc Inst, Toronto, ON M5T 2M9, Canada. Additional authors for this research include J. Chen, G. Zheng and W.C.W. Chan (see also Biotechnology).

Keywords for this news article include: Biotechnology, Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Xenograft, Nanotechnology, Xenotransplantion, Gold Nanoparticles, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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