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Studies from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Yield New Information about Biotechnology (Force-controlled manipulation of single cells: from AFM to...

August 6, 2014



Studies from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Yield New Information about Biotechnology (Force-controlled manipulation of single cells: from AFM to FluidFM)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Current study results on Technology have been published. According to news reporting originating in Karlsruhe, Germany, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The ability to perturb individual cells and to obtain information at the single-cell level is of central importance for addressing numerous biological questions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers great potential for this prospering field."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, "Traditionally used as an imaging tool, more recent developments have extended the variety of cell-manipulation protocols. Fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM) combines AFM with microfluidics via microchanneled cantilevers with nano-sized apertures. The crucial element of the technology is the connection of the hollow cantilevers to a pressure controller, allowing their operation in liquid as force-controlled nanopipettes under optical control."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Proof-of-concept studies demonstrated a broad spectrum of single-cell applications including isolation, deposition, adhesion and injection in a range of biological systems."

For more information on this research see: Force-controlled manipulation of single cells: from AFM to FluidFM. Trends in Biotechnology, 2014;32(7):381-388. Trends in Biotechnology can be contacted at: Elsevier Science London, 84 Theobalds Rd, London WC1X 8RR, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Trends in Biotechnology - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/405917)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting O. Guillaume-Gentil, Karlsruhe Inst Technol, DFG Center Funct Nanostruct, D-76131 Karlsruhe, Germany. Additional authors for this research include E. Potthoff, D. Ossola, C.M. Franz, T. Zambelli and J.A. Vorholt (see also Technology).

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Germany, Karlsruhe, Technology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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