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Researchers from University of Science Malaysia Detail New Studies and Findings in the Area of Carboxylic Acids [Fuel Properties of Croton...

August 6, 2014



Researchers from University of Science Malaysia Detail New Studies and Findings in the Area of Carboxylic Acids [Fuel Properties of Croton megalocarpus, Calophyllum inophyllum, and Cocos nucifera (coconut) Methyl Esters and their Performance in ...]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Fresh data on Carboxylic Acids are presented in a new report. According to news reporting originating from Pulau Pinang, Malaysia, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Biodiesel has been considered recently as a viable alternative to fossil diesel fuels. This study aims to evaluate the potential of biodiesel production from Croton megalocarpus oil and compared it with coconut (Cocos nucifera) and Calophyllum inophyllum methyl esters."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the University of Science Malaysia, "The study presents the physical and chemical properties of Croton megalocarpus, Calophyllum inophyllum and coconut methyl esters (CMME, CIME, and COME) together with their 10 and 20% blends by volume (B-10 and B-20). This is followed by evaluating their blends in a multicylinder Mitsubishi Pajero diesel engine. It has been found that the properties of all biodiesel and their blends are comparable with ASTM D6751 and ASTM D7467 standards, respectively. Over the entire range of speed, it was found that the B10 and B20 blends of CMME, CIME, and COME result in average reduction in torque and brake power (BP) along with increased brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) compared to pure diesel fuel. With respect to engine emissions, the fuel blends resulted in an average reduction in carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. However, the CMME and COME blends resulted in increased emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO) whereas CIME emits lower NO compared to pure diesel."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "It is concluded that B-10 and B-20 biodiesel blends can be used as diesel fuel substitutes without additional modifications."

For more information on this research see: Fuel Properties of Croton megalocarpus, Calophyllum inophyllum, and Cocos nucifera (coconut) Methyl Esters and their Performance in a Multicylinder Diesel Engine. Energy Technology, 2013;1(11):685-694. Energy Technology can be contacted at: Wiley-V C H Verlag Gmbh, Boschstrasse 12, D-69469 Weinheim, Germany (see also Carboxylic Acids).

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A.E. Atabani, University of Sains Malaysia, Sch Chem Engn, Nibong Tebal 14300, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Additional authors for this research include I.A. Badruddin, T.M.I. Mahlia, H.H. Masjuki, M. Mofijur, K.T. Lee and W.T. Chong.

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Biotechnology, Energy, Esters, Malaysia, Biodiesel, Oil & Gas, Diesel Fuel, Oil and Gas, Pulau Pinang, Bioengineering, Carboxylic Acids

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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