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Researchers from Iowa State University Report Recent Findings in Bioinformatics (The twin-arginine subunit C in Oscarella: origin, evolution, and...

August 6, 2014



Researchers from Iowa State University Report Recent Findings in Bioinformatics (The twin-arginine subunit C in Oscarella: origin, evolution, and potential functional significance)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Current study results on Biotechnology have been published. According to news reporting from Ames, Iowa, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is a protein transport system that moves completely folded proteins across lipid membranes. Genes encoding components of the pathway have been found in the genomes of many Bacteria, Archaea, and eukaryotic organelles including chloroplasts, plant mitochondria, and the mitochondria of many protists."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Iowa State University, "However, with a single exception, Tat genes are absent from the mitochondrial genomes of all animals. The only exception comes from the homoscleromorph sponges in the family Oscarellidae, whose mitochondrial genomes encode a gene for tatC, the largest subunit of the complex. Here, we explore the origin and evolution of the mitochondrial tatC gene in Oscarellidae, and use bioinformatic approaches to evaluate its functional significance. We conclude that tatC in Homoscleromorpha sponges was likely inherited from the ancestral proto-mitochondrial genome, implying multiple independent losses of the mitochondrial Tat pathway during the evolution of opisthokonts."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "In addition, bioinformatic evidence suggests that tatC comprises the entire Tat pathway in Oscarellidae, and that the Rieske Fe/S protein of mitochondrial complex III is its likely substrate."

For more information on this research see: The twin-arginine subunit C in Oscarella: origin, evolution, and potential functional significance. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 2013;53(3):495-502. Integrative and Comparative Biology can be contacted at: Oxford Univ Press, Great Clarendon St, Oxford OX2 6DP, England. (Oxford University Press - www.oup.com/; Integrative and Comparative Biology - icb.oxfordjournals.org)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting W. Pett, Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010, United States (see also Biotechnology).

Publisher contact information for the journal Integrative and Comparative Biology is: Oxford Univ Press, Great Clarendon St, Oxford OX2 6DP, England.

Keywords for this news article include: Ames, Iowa, Biotechnology, United States, Bioengineering, Applied Bioinformatics, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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