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Researchers from Chonnam National University Report Recent Findings in Gene Therapy (Selective transfection with osmotically active sorbitol modified...

August 7, 2014



Researchers from Chonnam National University Report Recent Findings in Gene Therapy (Selective transfection with osmotically active sorbitol modified PEI nanoparticles for enhanced anti-cancer gene therapy)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Gene Therapy Weekly -- Current study results on Biotechnology have been published. According to news reporting originating from Kwangju, South Korea, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Polysorbitol-mediated transporter (PSMT) has been previously shown to achieve high transfection efficiency with minimal cytotoxicity. Polysorbitol backbone possesses osmotic properties and leads to enhanced cellular uptake."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Chonnam National University, "The PSMT/pDNA nanoparticles were prepared and the particle size, surface charge of the nanoparticles was determined for the study. PSMT delivers genes into cells by the caveolae mediated endocytic pathway. Caveolae expression is usually altered in transformed cancer cells. Transfection through the caveolae may help PSMT to selectively transfect cancer cells rather than normal cells. Transfection of the luciferase gene by PSMT was tested in various cell types including cancer cell lines, primary cells, and immortalized cells. Luciferase transgene expression mediated by PSMT was remarkably increased in HeLa cells compared to expression using the control carrier Lipofectamine. Moreover, the toxicity of PSMT was comparable to the control carrier (Lipofectamine) in the same cells. Selective transfection of cancer cells using PSMT was further confirmed by co-culture of cancer and normal cells, which showed that transgene expression was pre-dominantly achieved in cancer cells. A functional p53 gene was also delivered into HeLa cells using PSMT and the selective transgene expression of p53 protein in cancer cells was analyzed through western blotting and confocal microscopy."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "HeLa cells transfected with PSMT/p53 plasmid nanoparticles showed cellular damage and apoptosis, which was confirmed through propidium iodide staining."

For more information on this research see: Selective transfection with osmotically active sorbitol modified PEI nanoparticles for enhanced anti-cancer gene therapy. Colloids and Surfaces B-Biointerfaces, 2014;119():126-136. Colloids and Surfaces B-Biointerfaces can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands (see also Biotechnology).

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting K.C.T. Nguyen, Chonnam National University, Sch Med, PLUS Center Creat Biomed Scientists BK21, Kwangju 501746, South Korea. Additional authors for this research include M. Muthiah, M.A. Islam, R.S. Kalash, C.S. Cho, H. Park, I.K. Lee, H.J. Kim, I.K. Park and K.A. Cho.

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Biotechnology, Cancer, Kwangju, Caveolae, Genetics, Oncology, p53 Gene, Hela Cells, Organelles, South Korea, Luciferases, Gene Therapy, Nanoparticle, Cell Membrane, Bioengineering, Nanotechnology, Coated Vesicles, Cellular Structures, Cytoplasmic Vesicles, Emerging Technologies, Enzymes and Coenzymes

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Gene Therapy Weekly


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