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Researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Target Applied microbiology and biotechnology (Soil microbial community responses to antibiotic-contaminated manure...

August 6, 2014



Researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Target Applied microbiology and biotechnology (Soil microbial community responses to antibiotic-contaminated manure under different soil moisture regimes)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Research findings on Biotechnology are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting originating in Oberschleissheim, Germany, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Sulfadiazine (SDZ) is an antibiotic frequently administered to livestock, and it alters microbial communities when entering soils with animal manure, but understanding the interactions of these effects to the prevailing climatic regime has eluded researchers. A climatic factor that strongly controls microbial activity is soil moisture."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Helmholtz-Zentrum, "Here, we hypothesized that the effects of SDZ on soil microbial communities will be modulated depending on the soil moisture conditions. To test this hypothesis, we performed a 49-day fully controlled climate chamber pot experiments with soil grown with Dactylis glomerata (L.). Manure-amended pots without or with SDZ contamination were incubated under a dynamic moisture regime (DMR) with repeated drying and rewetting changes of >20 % maximum water holding capacity (WHCmax) in comparison to a control moisture regime (CMR) at an average soil moisture of 38 % WHCmax. We then monitored changes in SDZ concentration as well as in the phenotypic phospholipid fatty acid and genotypic 16S rRNA gene fragment patterns of the microbial community after 7, 20, 27, 34, and 49 days of incubation. The results showed that strongly changing water supply made SDZ accessible to mild extraction in the short term."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "As a result, and despite rather small SDZ effects on community structures, the PLFA-derived microbial biomass was suppressed in the SDZ-contaminated DMR soils relative to the CMR ones, indicating that dynamic moisture changes accelerate the susceptibility of the soil microbial community to antibiotics."

For more information on this research see: Soil microbial community responses to antibiotic-contaminated manure under different soil moisture regimes. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 2014;98(14):6487-6495. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology can be contacted at: Springer, 233 Spring St, New York, NY 10013, USA. (Springer - www.springer.com; Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology - www.springerlink.com/content/0175-7598/)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting R. Reichel, Deutsch Forschungszentrum Gesundheit & Umwelt Gmb, Res Unit Environm Simulat, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, D-85764 Oberschleissheim, Germany. Additional authors for this research include V. Radl, I. Rosendahl, A. Albert, W. Amelung, M. Schloter and S. Thiele-Bruhn (see also Biotechnology).

Keywords for this news article include: Biotechnology, Europe, Germany, Oberschleissheim

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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