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Recent Reports from Stanford University School of Medicine Highlight Findings in Leptospirosis (Multiplex nucleic acid amplification test for...

August 5, 2014



Recent Reports from Stanford University School of Medicine Highlight Findings in Leptospirosis (Multiplex nucleic acid amplification test for diagnosis of dengue fever, malaria, and leptospirosis)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Data detailed on Spirochaetales Infections have been presented. According to news reporting originating from Stanford, California, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Dengue, leptospirosis, and malaria are among the most common etiologies of systemic undifferentiated febrile illness (UFI) among travelers to the developing world, and these pathogens all have the potential to cause life-threatening illness in returned travelers. The current study describes the development of an internally controlled multiplex nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of dengue virus (DENV) and Leptospira and Plasmodium species, with a specific callout for Plasmodium falciparum (referred to as the UFI assay)."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the Stanford University School of Medicine, "During analytical evaluation, the UFI assay displayed a wide dynamic range and a sensitive limit of detection for each target, including all four DENV serotypes. In a clinical evaluation including 210 previously tested samples, the sensitivities of the UFI assay were 98% for DENV (58/59 samples detected) and 100% for Leptospira and malaria (65/65 and 20/20 samples, respectively). Malaria samples included all five Plasmodium species known to cause human disease. The specificity of the UFI assay was 100% when evaluated with a panel of 66 negative clinical samples. Furthermore, no amplification was observed when extracted nucleic acids from related pathogens were tested. Compared with whole-blood samples, the UFI assay remained positive for Plasmodium in 11 plasma samples from patients with malaria (parasitemia levels of 0.0037 to 3.4%)."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The syndrome-based design of the UFI assay, combined with the sensitivities of the component tests, represents a significant improvement over the individual diagnostic tests available for these pathogens."

For more information on this research see: Multiplex nucleic acid amplification test for diagnosis of dengue fever, malaria, and leptospirosis. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 2014;52(6):2011-8 (see also Spirochaetales Infections).

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J.J. Waggoner, Dept. of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States. Additional authors for this research include J. Abeynayake, I. Balassiano, M. Lefterova, M.K. Sahoo, Y. Liu, J.M. Vital-Brazil, L. Gresh, A. Balmaseda, E. Harris, N. Banaei and B.A Pinsky.

Keywords for this news article include: Stanford, California, United States, Leptospirosis, North and Central America, Spirochaetales Infections, Bacterial Infections and Mycoses, Gram Negative Bacterial Infections.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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