News Column

NorthShore University Health System Reports Findings in Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering (Spatially resolved optical and ultrastructural...

August 5, 2014



NorthShore University Health System Reports Findings in Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering (Spatially resolved optical and ultrastructural properties of colorectal and pancreatic field carcinogenesis observed by inverse spectroscopic ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Weekly -- Current study results on Biotechnology have been published. According to news reporting originating from Evanston, Illinois, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Field carcinogenesis is the initial stage of cancer progression. Understanding field carcinogenesis is valuable for both cancer biology and clinical medicine."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from NorthShore University Health System, "Here, we used inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography to study colorectal cancer (CRC) and pancreatic cancer (PC) field carcinogenesis. Depth-resolved optical and ultrastructural properties of the mucosa were quantified from histologically normal rectal biopsies from patients with and without colon adenomas (n = 85) as well as from histologically normal peri-ampullary duodenal biopsies from patients with and without PC (n = 22). Changes in the epithelium and stroma in CRC field carcinogenesis were separately quantified. In both compartments, optical and ultra-structural alterations were consistent. Optical alterations included lower backscattering (mu(b)) and reduced scattering (mu(s)') coefficients and higher anisotropy factor g. Ultrastructurally pronounced alterations were observed at length scales up to similar to 450 nm, with the shape of the mass density correlation function having a higher shape factor D, thus implying a shift to larger length scales. Similar alterations were found in the PC field carcinogenesis despite the difference in genetic pathways and etiologies."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "We further verified that the chromatin clumping in epithelial cells and collagen cross-linking caused D to increase in vitro and could be among the mechanisms responsible for the observed changes in epithelium and stroma, respectively."

For more information on this research see: Spatially resolved optical and ultrastructural properties of colorectal and pancreatic field carcinogenesis observed by inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography. Journal of Biomedical Optics, 2014;19(3):214-229. Journal of Biomedical Optics can be contacted at: Spie-Soc Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, 1000 20TH St, PO Box 10, Bellingham, WA 98225, USA (see also Biotechnology).

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J. Yi, NorthShore Univ Hlth Syst, Dept. of Internal Med, Evanston, IL 60201, United States. Additional authors for this research include A.J. Radosevich, Y. Stypula-Cyrus, N.N. Mutyal, S.M. Azarin, E. Horcher, M.J. Goldberg, L.K. Bianchi, S. Bajaj, H.K. Roy and V. Backman.

Keywords for this news article include: Biotechnology, Cancer, Evanston, Illinois, Genetics, Oncology, Pancreas, United States, Gastroenterology, Imaging Technology, North and Central America, Optical Coherence Tomography

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Cancer Weekly


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters