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New Nanoparticles Findings from University of York Described (Investigating the toxicity, uptake, nanoparticle formation and genetic response of...

August 5, 2014



New Nanoparticles Findings from University of York Described (Investigating the toxicity, uptake, nanoparticle formation and genetic response of plants to gold)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- New research on Nanoparticles is the subject of a report. According to news reporting originating in York, United Kingdom, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis) to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of York, "Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold) were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake."

For more information on this research see: Investigating the toxicity, uptake, nanoparticle formation and genetic response of plants to gold. Plos One, 2014;9(4):e93793. (Public Library of Science - www.plos.org; Plos One - www.plosone.org)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A.F. Taylor, Centre for Novel Agricultural Products, Dept. of Biology, University of York, York, UK. Additional authors for this research include E.L. Rylott, C.W. Anderson and N.C Bruce (see also Nanoparticles).

Keywords for this news article include: York, Europe, United Kingdom, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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