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New Findings from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in the Area of Myeloid Cells Described (Surface Chemistry of Gold...

August 8, 2014



New Findings from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in the Area of Myeloid Cells Described (Surface Chemistry of Gold Nanoparticles Mediates Their Exocytosis in Macrophages)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Researchers detail new data in Myeloid Cells. According to news reporting originating in Taejon, South Korea, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Significant quantities of synthetic nanoparticles circulating in the body are cleared and retained for long periods of time in the resident macrophages of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), increasing the likelihood of nanoparticle-mediated chronic toxicity. To date, there has been limited effort to understand how these nanoparticles leave the macrophages."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), "Here, we demonstrate that the native surface chemistries of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and their subsequent opsonization by serum proteins play critical roles in the exocytosis patterns in macrophages. The cationic GNPs were retained in the cells for a relatively long time, likely due to their intracellular agglomeration. In contrast, the PEGylated GNPs migrated in the cytoplasm in the form of individual particles and exited the cells rapidly because the PEG coating mitigated interactions between GNPs and intracellular proteins. Additionally, their exocytosis pattern was not significantly governed by the size, particularly in the range from 10 to 40 nm."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "These results suggest that systemic excretion and toxicity of nanoparticles cleared in the MPS could be modulated by engineering their surface chemistry."

For more information on this research see: Surface Chemistry of Gold Nanoparticles Mediates Their Exocytosis in Macrophages. ACS Nano, 2014;8(6):6232-6241. ACS Nano can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; ACS Nano - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/ancac3)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting N. Oh, Korea Adv Inst Sci & Technol, Inst Nanocentury, Taejon 305701, South Korea (see also Myeloid Cells).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Taejon, Chemicals, Chemistry, Immunology, South Korea, Macrophages, Myeloid Cells, Nanotechnology, Gold Nanoparticles, Emerging Technologies, Connective Tissue Cells, Mononuclear Phagocyte System

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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