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Findings on DNA Research Detailed by Researchers at University of North Carolina (A highly efficient synthetic vector: nonhydrodynamic delivery of...

August 4, 2014



Findings on DNA Research Detailed by Researchers at University of North Carolina (A highly efficient synthetic vector: nonhydrodynamic delivery of DNA to hepatocyte nuclei in vivo)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Gastroenterology Week -- Investigators publish new report on DNA Research. According to news reporting originating from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Multifunctional membrane-core nanoparticles, composed of calcium phosphate cores, arginine-rich peptides, cationic and PEGylated lipid membranes, and galactose targeting ligands, have been developed as synthetic vectors for efficient nuclear delivery of plasmid DNA and subsequent gene expression in hepatocytes in vivo. Targeted particles exhibited rapid and extensive hepatic accumulation and were predominantly internalized by hepatocytes, while the inclusion of such peptides in LCP was sufficient to elicit high degrees of nuclear translocation of plasmid DNA."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the University of North Carolina, "Monocyclic CR8C significantly enhanced in vivo gene expression over 10-fold more than linear CR8C, likely due to a release-favoring mechanism of the DNA/peptide complex. Though 100-fold lower in activity than that achieved via hydrodynamic injection, this formulation presents as a much less invasive alternative."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "To our knowledge, this is the most effective synthetic vector for liver gene transfer."

For more information on this research see: A highly efficient synthetic vector: nonhydrodynamic delivery of DNA to hepatocyte nuclei in vivo. Acs Nano, 2013;7(6):5376-84. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Acs Nano - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/ancac3)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y. Hu, The Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, United States. Additional authors for this research include M.T. Haynes, Y. Wang, F. Liu and L. Huang (see also DNA Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Chapel Hill, DNA Research, United States, North Carolina, Gastroenterology, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Gastroenterology Week


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