News Column

Study Data from University of Maryland Provide New Insights into Nanocomposites (Duality of the interfacial thermal conductance in graphene-based...

July 11, 2014



Study Data from University of Maryland Provide New Insights into Nanocomposites (Duality of the interfacial thermal conductance in graphene-based nanocomposites)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- Research findings on Nanocomposites are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting originating in College Park, Maryland, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The thermal conductance of graphene-matrix interfaces plays a key role in controlling the thermal properties of graphene-based nanocomposites. Using atomistic simulations, we found that the interfacial thermal conductance depends strongly on the mode of heat transfer at graphene-matrix interfaces: if heat enters graphene from one side of its basal plane and immediately leaves it through the other side, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(across), is large; if heat enters graphene from both sides of its basal plane and leaves it at a position far away on its basal plane, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(non-across), is small."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Maryland, "For a single-layer graphene immersed in liquid octane, Gacross is similar to 150 MW/m(2)K while G(non-across) is similar to 5 MW/(MK)-K-2. G(across) decreases with increasing multi-layer graphene thickness (i.e., number of layers in graphene) and approaches an asymptotic value of 100 MW/m(2)K for 7-layer graphenes. G(non-across) increases only marginally as the graphene sheet thickness increases. Such a duality of the interface thermal conductance for different probing methods and its dependence on graphene sheet thickness can be traced ultimately to the unique physical and chemical structure of graphene materials."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The ramifications of these results in areas such as the optimal design of graphene-based thermal nanocomposites are discussed."

For more information on this research see: Duality of the interfacial thermal conductance in graphene-based nanocomposites. Carbon, 2014;75():169-177. Carbon can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Carbon - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/258)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y. Liu, University of Maryland, Dept. of Mech Engn, College Park, MD 20742, United States. Additional authors for this research include J.S. Huang, B. Yang, B.G. Sumpter and R. Qiao (see also Nanocomposites).

Keywords for this news article include: Maryland, College Park, United States, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Science Letter


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters