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Recent Studies from University of Central Florida Add New Data to Catecholamines (Design of a Multi-Dopamine-Modified Polymer Ligand Optimally Suited...

July 11, 2014



Recent Studies from University of Central Florida Add New Data to Catecholamines (Design of a Multi-Dopamine-Modified Polymer Ligand Optimally Suited for Interfacing Magnetic Nanoparticles with Biological Systems)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- New research on Catecholamines is the subject of a report. According to news reporting from Orlando, Florida, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "We have designed a set of multifunctional and multicoordinating polymer ligands that are optimally suited for surface functionalizing iron oxide and potentially other magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and promoting their integration into biological systems. The amphiphilic polymers are prepared by coupling (via nucleophilic addition) several amine-terminated dopamine anchoring groups, poly(ethylene glycol) moieties, and reactive groups onto a poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PIMA) chain."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of Central Florida, "This design greatly benefits from the highly efficient and reagent-free one-step reaction of maleic anhydride groups with amine-containing molecules. The availability of several dopamine groups in the same ligand greatly enhances the ligand affinity, via multiple coordination, to the magnetic NPs, while the hydrophilic and reactive groups promote colloidal stability in buffer media and allow subsequent conjugation with target biomolecules. Iron oxide nanoparticles ligand exchanged with these polymer ligands have a compact hydrodynamic size and exhibit enhanced long-term colloidal stability over the pH range of 4-12 and in the presence of excess electrolytes. Nanoparticles ligated with terminally reactive polymers have been easily coupled to target dyes and tested in live cell imaging with no measurable cytotoxicity."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Finally, the resulting hydrophilic nanoparticles exhibit large and size-dependent r(2) relaxivity values."

For more information on this research see: Design of a Multi-Dopamine-Modified Polymer Ligand Optimally Suited for Interfacing Magnetic Nanoparticles with Biological Systems. Langmuir, 2014;30(21):6197-6208. Langmuir can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Langmuir - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/langd5)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting W.T. Wang, University of Central Florida, Dept. of Chem, Orlando, FL 32826, United States. Additional authors for this research include X. Ji, H. Bin Na, M. Safi, A. Smith, G. Palui, J.M. Perez and H. Mattoussi (see also Catecholamines).

Keywords for this news article include: Orlando, Florida, Dopamine, Nanoparticle, United States, Catecholamines, Nanotechnology, Biogenic Amines, Organic Chemicals, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Science Letter


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