News Column

New Findings from University of Montana Describe Advances in Epithelial Cells (The Effect of Size on Ag Nanosphere Toxicity in Macrophage Cell Models...

July 11, 2014



New Findings from University of Montana Describe Advances in Epithelial Cells (The Effect of Size on Ag Nanosphere Toxicity in Macrophage Cell Models and Lung Epithelial Cell Lines Is Dependent on Particle Dissolution)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- Current study results on Epithelial Cells have been published. According to news reporting originating in Missoula, Montana, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Silver (Ag) nanomaterials are increasingly used in a variety of commercial applications. This study examined the effect of size (20 and 110 nm) and surface stabilization (citrate and PVP coatings) on toxicity, particle uptake and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in a variety of macrophage and epithelial cell lines."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Montana, "The results indicated that smaller Ag (20 nm), regardless of coating, were more toxic in both cell types and most active in the THP-1 macrophages. TEM imaging demonstrated that 20 nm Ag nanospheres dissolved more rapidly than 110 nm Ag nanospheres in acidic phagolysosomes consistent with Ag ion mediated toxicity. In addition, there were some significant differences in epithelial cell line in vitro exposure models. The order of the epithelial cell lines' sensitivity to Ag was LA4 > MLE12 > C10. The macrophage sensitivity to Ag toxicity was C57BL/6 AM > MARCO null AM, which indicated that the MARCO receptor was involved in uptake of the negatively charged Ag particles. These results support the idea that Ag nanosphere toxicity and NLRP3 inflammasome activation are determined by the rate of surface dissolution, which is based on relative surface area."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "This study highlights the importance of utilizing multiple models for in vitro studies to evaluate nanomaterials."

For more information on this research see: The Effect of Size on Ag Nanosphere Toxicity in Macrophage Cell Models and Lung Epithelial Cell Lines Is Dependent on Particle Dissolution. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2014;15(4):6815-6830. International Journal of Molecular Sciences can be contacted at: Mdpi Ag, Postfach, Ch-4005 Basel, Switzerland (see also Epithelial Cells).

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting R.F. Hamilton, University of Montana, Center Environm Hlth Sci, Dept. of Biomed & Pharmaceut Sci, Missoula, MT 59812, United States. Additional authors for this research include S. Buckingham and A. Holian.

Keywords for this news article include: Montana, Missoula, Immunology, Macrophages, Nanomaterial, United States, Myeloid Cells, Nanotechnology, Epithelial Cells, Emerging Technologies, Connective Tissue Cells, North and Central America, Mononuclear Phagocyte System

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Science Letter


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters