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Report Summarizes Nanocrystals Study Findings from National Institute of Materials Physics (Annealing induced changes in the structure, optical and...

August 1, 2014



Report Summarizes Nanocrystals Study Findings from National Institute of Materials Physics (Annealing induced changes in the structure, optical and electrical properties of GeTiO2 nanostructured films)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- Data detailed on Nanocrystals have been presented. According to news originating from Magurele, Romania, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The GeTiO2 amorphous films were deposited by magnetron sputtering and subsequently annealed at 400, 550, 600 and 700 degrees C for nanostructuring. The structure of annealed films was investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the National Institute of Materials Physics, "The transmittance spectra of all annealed GeTiO2 films were measured and simulated by using Bruggeman effective medium approximation considering components of TiO2 anatase, crystalline Ge, GeO2 and voids determined from the structure investigations. The electrical behavior of 400, 600 and 700 degrees C annealed films was studied by measuring current-voltage characteristics. We found that by increasing the annealing temperature the films thickness decreases from 330 nm (as-deposited films) to 290 nm (700 degrees C annealed films). The 400 degrees C annealed films are amorphous, while all the others annealed at higher temperatures are crystallized (X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy). In the 550 and 600 degrees C annealed films we found the (TiGe)O-2 rutile structure which is formed by starting from the GeO2 tetragonal structure with high Ti content. Additionally, these films contain TiO2 anatase structure and cubic Ge nanocrystals. At 700 degrees C annealing temperature, a surface layer of GeO2 tetragonal nanocrystals is formed by Ge diffusion and a part of Ge is lost. The experimental transmittance spectra indicate a broadening of the transparency range by increasing the annealing temperature, and the simulated ones also indicate this behavior with the decrease of Ge content, the experimental and simulated spectra being in good agreement."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Also, the increase of annealing temperature produces an increase of electrical conductivity."

For more information on this research see: Annealing induced changes in the structure, optical and electrical properties of GeTiO2 nanostructured films. Applied Surface Science, 2014;309():168-174. Applied Surface Science can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Applied Surface Science - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/505669)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from L. Stavarache, Natl Inst Mat Phys, Magurele 077125, Romania. Additional authors for this research include A.M. Lepadatu, V.S. Teodorescu, A.C. Galca and M.L. Ciurea (see also Nanocrystals).

Keywords for this news article include: Magurele, Romania, Europe, Emerging Technologies, Nanocrystal, Nanocrystals, Nanotechnology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Science Letter


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