News Column

Patent Issued for Respiratory Secretion Retention Device, System and Method

July 30, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Engineering -- From Alexandria, Virginia, VerticalNews journalists report that a patent by the inventors Landis, Robert M. (Mountainside, NJ); Lewis, Charles A. (Carrabelle, FL); Caruso, Angelo (Boca Raton, FL); Sher, Bruce (Lighthouse Point, FL); Collazo, Louis Javier (Pompano Beach, FL); Chandran, Sanjay (Boca Raton, FL); Hansen, Norman (Highland Beach, FL), filed on December 28, 2009, was published online on July 15, 2014.

The patent's assignee for patent number 8777933 is Mergenet Medical, Inc. (Coconut Creek, FL).

News editors obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "The present invention relates to artificial airways and more particularly to an airway device for controlling respiratory secretions in artificial airways, and associated devices such as respiratory gas delivery devices.

"The use of artificial airways is a common method of maintaining an open airway for patients who require some type of respiratory assistance. Artificial airways come in a variety of options depending on the patient and level of respiratory intervention required. Large numbers of artificial airways have three common features. First, the artificial airway will be a flexible tube that extends into the patient's trachea. Second, most artificial airways will have an inflatable cuff near the distal end of the tube. The inflatable cuff can be used to make an airtight seal, e.g., for nasal tracheal, oral tracheal and tracheostomy tubes where the entire breath of the patient is directed through the tube. Third, the standard artificial airway has a 15 mm fitting on the external opening of the tube to which respiratory gas delivery devices and instruments can be attached compliant with the ISO 5356; Anesthetic and Respiratory Equipment--Conical Connectors standard.

"One of the common issues with having the patient breathe through these artificial airways is that respiratory secretions, which would normally enter the pharynx and be swallowed, expectorated or coughed out through the mouth, are forced to egress through the lumen of the artificial airway. The presence of the tube, being a foreign object in the airway can also stimulate respiratory secretions.

"Keeping the tube and airway clear of secretions is a procedure performed by clinicians, which requires training and vigilance. Depending on the condition of the patient, the frequency of clearing the airway with a suction catheter varies greatly. When secretions accumulate in the tube there is added resistance to breathing and when the patient is strong enough, a forceful exhalation sends the secretions out through the tube and into the room or into any device attached to the tube.

"Some fluid trap devices for use between an artificial airway and respiratory gas delivery devices, such as a ventilator circuit, have a fill volume substantially independent of orientation of the trap within the fluid circuit. Such fluid trap devices are disadvantageous as they impose unnecessary and excessive dead-space (e.g., exhaled air that is re-breathed) to achieve the independent orientation.

"Typically, when a ventilator circuit or an instrument is detached from an artificial airway, the patient coughs and respiratory secretions and fluids are sprayed into the room. In addition, it is common for a patient on a ventilator to have secretions accumulate inside an artificial airway, such as endotracheal (ET) tube, with no place to go but up the tube, down the tube or into whatever breathing instrument is attached to the ET tube.

"In the last decade, the use of 'closed suction' devices with ventilator breathing circuits has become a standard at many medical facilities. A closed suction device allows for access to the airway with a suction catheter without detaching or removing the treatment device from the artificial airway. Closed suction systems add additional support to clinicians by greatly reducing the time and effort necessary for clearing the airway. A closed suction device for example, can allow a catheter to advance into the artificial airway for suctioning and then be withdrawn into a protective sheath where it is protected from contamination when the catheter is not in use. The closed suction catheter may be used multiple times without opening the device to the atmosphere, and is usually used for one to several days. A closed suction system allows access to the ventilator breathing circuit connected with the patient to remain 'closed' as opposed to methods that require it to be 'opened' to the atmosphere for access. Closed suction also reduces risk of microbial contamination of the artificial airway during suctioning thereby protecting the patient's airway from infection. In numerous medical institutions, the infection control departments have made the use of closed suction a standard of practice by requiring that all intubated patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) have a closed suction system installed.

"Most clinicians find that there are a significant number of instances when it is necessary to detach a ventilator circuit or respiratory instrument (i.e. 'open the circuit'), and having protection from patient secretions entering the environment during these occasions is most desirable.

"There are three main problems with secretions in the tube of an artificial airway. First, when the ventilator circuit is disconnected, secretions can be sprayed into the room if the patient coughs. Second, secretions in the artificial airway result in compromised breathing. Third, when secretions are forced out into the attached ventilator circuit, these secretions can foul the attached instruments, such as a heat and moisture exchange (HME) device, and the like."

As a supplement to the background information on this patent, VerticalNews correspondents also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent: "Embodiments of the present invention address deficiencies of the art in respect to artificial airways and respiratory secretions management and provide a novel and non-obvious apparatus, system, and method for managing respiratory secretions and fluids in a section of an artificial airway, ventilator circuit system. In an embodiment of the invention, a respiratory secretion retention (RSR) device configured for fluidly connecting to an artificial airway can be provided. A respiratory secretion retention device configured for fluidly connecting to an artificial airway comprising a housing that defines a passageway for the flow of respiratory gases, a chamber defined by the housing with a portion of the chamber configured to retain exhaled respiratory particulate and liquid, a patient side port coupled with the housing, which is in fluid communication with an artificial airway and at least one access port configured to provide access to the chamber and the patient port. In another aspect of this embodiment, the at least one access port can include a control valve, where the control valve can be located in a downstream position of a passage of the access port to control access from the access port to the chamber.

"In another embodiment of the invention, a respiratory secretion retention (RSR) device configured for fluidly connecting to an artificial airway can be provided. The respiratory secretion retention (RSR) device can include a housing that defines a passageway for the flow of respiratory gases, a chamber defined by the housing with a portion of the chamber configured to retain exhaled respiratory particulate and liquid, a patient side port coupled to the housing, which is in fluid communication with an artificial airway, a suction tube subassembly coupled to the housing, which defines a medical instrument passage and a suction tube portion and at least one access port configured to provide access to the chamber and the patient side port. In another aspect of this embodiment the suction tube subassembly is coupled to a actuation mechanism that provides for repositioning of the suction tube subassembly with respect to the housing.

"In yet another embodiment of the invention, a respiratory secretion retention (RSR) device configured for fluidly connecting to an artificial airway can be provided. The respiratory secretion retention (RSR) device can include a housing that defines a passageway for the flow of respiratory gases, a chamber defined by the housing with a portion of the chamber configured to retain exhaled respiratory particulate and liquid, a patient port defined by the housing, which is in fluid communication with an artificial airway, at least one access port configured to provide access to the chamber and the patient port and a tube coaxially aligned and coupled to the access port and the patient port, to define a passage between the access port and the patient port. In another aspect of this embodiment, the tube includes a diverter in the passage. In yet another aspect of this embodiment, the diverter is rotatably hinged on a wall of the tube. In still yet another aspect of this embodiment, the RSR device can include a sleeve surrounding the tube portion that includes a plurality of first apertures and the tube portion includes at least one second aperture.

"In yet another embodiment of the invention, a respiratory secretion retention (RSR) device configured for connecting to an artificial airway can include a housing that defines a passageway for the flow of respiratory gases, a chamber defined by the housing where a portion of the chamber is configured to retain exhaled respiratory particulate and liquid, a patient port defined by the housing that is in fluid communication with an artificial airway, an access port opposite the patient port that is configured to provide access to the chamber and the patient port and a tube coaxially aligned and coupled to the access port and the patient port, the tube defining a passage between the access port and the patient port. In another aspect of this embodiment, the tube can include a diverter in the passage. In yet another aspect of this embodiment, the diverter is rotatably hinged on a wall of the tube. In still yet another aspect of this embodiment, the tube can include a first aperture and a second aperture.

"In an embodiment of the invention the RSR device may include a port for instilling fluids, such as saline or medication. Medication may be aerosolized for delivery of medication to the airway.

"In still another embodiment of the invention, a respiratory secretion retention (RSR) device configured to connect to an artificial airway can be provided. The respiratory secretion retention (RSR) device can include a housing that defines a passageway for the flow of respiratory gases, a chamber that is defined by the housing, where a portion of the chamber is configured to retain exhaled respiratory particulate and liquid, and an expiratory port of the housing, wherein the expiratory port is not parallel to a gas delivery port of the housing during some phase of use of the device. In an aspect of this embodiment, the housing is configured to provide for repositioning of the gas delivery port with respect to the expiratory port.

"In still yet another embodiment of the invention, a respiratory secretion retention (RSR) device configured to connect to an artificial airway can be provided. The respiratory secretion retention (RSR) device can include a housing that defines a passageway for the flow of respiratory gases, a chamber that is defined by the housing, where a portion of the chamber is configured to retain exhaled respiratory particulate and liquid, and a clip coupled to the reservoir and configured to limit the volume, and therefore deadspace, of the reservoir to the area of the reservoir above the clip. In an aspect of this embodiment, the reservoir has an access port for the removal of the retained secretions.

"Additional aspects of the invention will be set forth in part in the description which follows, and in part will be obvious from the description, or may be learned by practice of the invention. The aspects of the invention will be realized and attained by means of the elements and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims. It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are exemplary and explanatory only and are not restrictive of the invention, as claimed."

For additional information on this patent, see: Landis, Robert M.; Lewis, Charles A.; Caruso, Angelo; Sher, Bruce; Collazo, Louis Javier; Chandran, Sanjay; Hansen, Norman. Respiratory Secretion Retention Device, System and Method. U.S. Patent Number 8777933, filed December 28, 2009, and published online on July 15, 2014. Patent URL: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8777933.PN.&OS=PN/8777933RS=PN/8777933

Keywords for this news article include: Mergenet Medical, Mergenet Medical Inc.

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Source: Journal of Engineering


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