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Investigators at Griffith University Report Findings in Risk Management ("I drove after drinking alcohol" and other risky driving behaviours reported...

August 1, 2014



Investigators at Griffith University Report Findings in Risk Management ("I drove after drinking alcohol" and other risky driving behaviours reported by young novice drivers)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Insurance Weekly News -- Current study results on Risk Management have been published. According to news originating from Nathan, Australia, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, "Volitional risky driving behaviours such as drink- and drug-driving (i.e. substance-impaired driving) and speeding contribute to the overrepresentation of young novice drivers in road crash fatalities, and crash risk is greatest during the first year of independent driving in particular. To explore the: (1) self-reported compliance of drivers with road rules regarding substance-impaired driving and other risky driving behaviours (e.g., speeding, driving while tired), one year after progression from a Learner to a Provisional (intermediate) licence; and (2) interrelationships between substance-impaired driving and other risky driving behaviours (e.g., crashes, offences, and Police avoidance)."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Griffith University, "Drivers (n = 1076; 319 males) aged 18-20 years were surveyed regarding their sociodemographics (age, gender) and self-reported driving behaviours including crashes, offences. Police avoidance, and driving intentions. A relatively small proportion of participants reported driving after taking drugs (6.3% of males, 1.3% of females) and drinking alcohol (18.5% of males, 11.8% of females). In comparison, a considerable proportion of participants reported at least occasionally exceeding speed limits (86.7% of novices), and risky behaviours like driving when tired (83.6% of novices). Substance-impaired driving was associated with avoiding Police, speeding, risky driving intentions, and self-reported crashes and offences. Forty-three percent of respondents who drove after taking drugs also reported alcohol-impaired driving. Behaviours of concern include drink driving, speeding, novice driving errors such as misjudging the speed of oncoming vehicles, violations of graduated driver licensing passenger restrictions, driving tired, driving faster if in a bad mood, and active punishment avoidance. Given the interrelationships between the risky driving behaviours, a deeper understanding of influential factors is required to inform targeted and general countermeasure implementation and evaluation during this critical driving period."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Notwithstanding this, a combination of enforcement, education, and engineering efforts appear necessary to improve the road safety of the young novice driver, and for the drink-driving young novice driver in particular."

For more information on this research see: "I drove after drinking alcohol" and other risky driving behaviours reported by young novice drivers. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 2014;70():65-73. Accident Analysis and Prevention can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Accident Analysis and Prevention - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/336)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from B. Scott-Parker, Griffith University, Griffith Hlth Inst, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia. Additional authors for this research include B. Watson, M.J. King and M.K. Hyde.

Keywords for this news article include: Nathan, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Risk Management

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Insurance Weekly News


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