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Researchers from University of La Frontera Report on Findings in Bioenergy (Energy flow in the soybean biodiesel production chain using ethanol as...

July 30, 2014



Researchers from University of La Frontera Report on Findings in Bioenergy (Energy flow in the soybean biodiesel production chain using ethanol as solvent extraction of oil from soybeans)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- New research on Bioenergy is the subject of a report. According to news reporting from Temuco, Chile, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Technological, energetic, economic and environmental feasibilities of a production system should be analyzed for the best conditions for implementing a process to be established. Refined soybean oil is a high-cost feedstock for biodiesel production, because it involves crop production, oil extraction and refining."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of La Frontera, "Desolventizing and refining steps are required to obtain edible oils within the market quality standards. The introduction of a new technology, i.e. the direct use of the rich-in-soybean oil ethanolic miscella to produce biodiesel would however avoid these high energy demanding steps. Material and energy flow analysis are tools adopted to evaluate production systems and to identify the most energy demanding steps, in order to improve the processes. This study aimed to establish a comparative analysis between the conventional biodiesel production process in Brazil and the direct rich-in-soybean oil ethanolic miscella transesterification based on the energy flow. Energy flows confirmed that biodiesel feedstock production is the most energy demanding step, followed by oil extraction. Rich-in-oil miscella transesterification step by chemical route demanded less energy, followed by refined oil ethanolysis and methanolysis. The enzymatic catalysis had the highest energy demand, due to the amount and especially, the catalyst support composition. Generally speaking, refined oil ethanolysis process presented better energy balance (60.5 MJ kg(-1)), followed by refined oil methanolysis (55.4 MJ rich-in-oil miscella chemical ethanolysis (44.3 MJ kg(-1)), rich-in-oil miscella enzymatic ethanolysis with co-solvent (9.5 MJ kg(-1)) and rich-in-oil miscella enzymatic ethanolysis (9.4 MJ kg(-1))."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "This showed that rich-in-oil miscella process has high potential to produce biodiesel competitively."

For more information on this research see: Energy flow in the soybean biodiesel production chain using ethanol as solvent extraction of oil from soybeans. Biomass & Bioenergy, 2014;66():39-48. Biomass & Bioenergy can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biomass & Bioenergy - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/986)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting N. Sangaletti-Gerhard, Univ La Frontera, Dept. of Chem Engn, Temuco, Chile. Additional authors for this research include T.L. Romanelli, T. Vieira, R. Navia and M.A.B. Regitano-d'Arce (see also Bioenergy).

Keywords for this news article include: Temuco, Chile, South America, Biodiesel, Bioenergy, Bioengineering, Biotechnology, Energy, Oil and Gas

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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