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Recent Findings from D.P. Herlemann and Co-Authors Provide New Insights into Life Science Research (Uncoupling of bacterial and terrigenous dissolved...

July 29, 2014



Recent Findings from D.P. Herlemann and Co-Authors Provide New Insights into Life Science Research (Uncoupling of bacterial and terrigenous dissolved organic matter dynamics in decomposition experiments)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Data detailed on Life Science Research have been presented. According to news reporting originating in Rostock, Germany, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The biodegradability of terrigenous dissolved organic matter (tDOM) exported to the sea has a major impact on the global carbon cycle, but our understanding of tDOM bioavailability is fragmentary. In this study, the effects of preparative tDOM isolation on microbial decomposition were investigated in incubation experiments consisting of mesocosms containing mesohaline water from the Baltic Sea."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research, "Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) consumption, molecular DOM composition, bacterial activities, and shifts in bacterial community structure were compared between mesocosms supplemented with riverine tDOM, either as filtered, particle-free river water or as a concentrate obtained by lyophilization/tangential ultrafiltration, and those containing only Baltic Sea water or river water. As shown using ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry (15 Tesla Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, FT-ICR-MS) covering approximately 4600 different DOM compounds, the three DOM preparation protocols resulted in distinct patterns of molecular DOM composition. However, despite DOC losses of 4-16% and considerable bacterial production, there was no significant change in DOM composition during the 28-day experiment. Moreover, tDOM addition affected neither DOC degradation nor bacterial dynamics significantly, regardless of the tDOM preparation. This result suggested that the introduced tDOM was largely not bioavailable, at least on the temporal scale of our experiment, and that the observed bacterial activity and DOC decomposition mainly reflected the degradation of unknown, labile, colloidal and low-molecular weight DOM, both of which escape the analytical window of FT-ICR-MS. In contrast to the different tDOM preparations, the initial bacterial inoculum and batch culture conditions determined bacterial community succession and superseded the effects of tDOM addition."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The uncoupling of tDOM and bacterial dynamics suggests that mesohaline bacterial communities cannot efficiently utilize tDOM and that in subarctic estuaries other factors are responsible for the removal of imported tDOM."

For more information on this research see: Uncoupling of bacterial and terrigenous dissolved organic matter dynamics in decomposition experiments. Plos One, 2014;9(4):e93945. (Public Library of Science - www.plos.org; Plos One - www.plosone.org)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting D.P. Herlemann, Biological Oceanography, Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemunde (IOW), Rostock, Germany. Additional authors for this research include M. Manecki, C. Meeske, F. Pollehne, M. Labrenz, D. Schulz-Bull, T. Dittmar and K. Jurgens (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Rostock, Germany, Europe, Life Science Research.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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