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New Lichenology Findings Has Been Reported by Investigators at Royal Botanical Gardens (Life on deadwood: cut stumps as a model system for the...

July 29, 2014



New Lichenology Findings Has Been Reported by Investigators at Royal Botanical Gardens (Life on deadwood: cut stumps as a model system for the succession and management of lichen diversity)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Life Science Research. According to news reporting from Midlothian, United Kingdom, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Coarse deadwood provides an important habitat for a suite of niche-specialist lichens in oldgrowth forests, for example, snags (standing dead trees) and fallen logs. Conversely, the scarcity of deadwood in managed forests is a limiting factor to lichen diversity, though cut stumps may provide an alternative habitat for deadwood species."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Royal Botanical Gardens, "The surface of cut stumps is an ecologically useful study system, facilitating standardized sampling with which to determine the pattern and process of deadwood succession. This study examined vegetation patterns for the surface of cut stumps at Abernethy RSPB Reserve in northern Scotland. We demonstrate the interrelationship between key topographic, management and edaphic factors during a successional process of terrestrialization. Consequently, we recommend that deadwood diversity might be maximized by 1) creating managed plots with varying degrees of canopy openness for sites with different levels of topographic exposure, and 2) providing cut stumps at different heights within plots, to ensure that during a rotational period the process of terrestrialization operates at different speeds among individual microhabitats. The study examined successional processes on cut stumps using two recently accessible and powerful statistical methods: 1) nonparametric multiplicative regression (NPMR), and 2) multivariate regression trees (MRT)."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "The principles on which these techniques are based are becoming the preferred statistical framework with which to provide robust interpretation of field-sampled data; they are unconstrained by prior assumptions as to the form of a species' niche response, and are data-led models evaluated based on cross-validated performance, thereby avoiding the complication of multiple hypothesis tests."

For more information on this research see: Life on deadwood: cut stumps as a model system for the succession and management of lichen diversity. Lichenologist, 2014;46(3):455-469. Lichenologist can be contacted at: Cambridge Univ Press, Edinburgh Bldg, Shaftesbury Rd, CB2 8RU Cambridge, England. (Cambridge University Press - www.cambridge.org; Lichenologist - journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=LIC)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting V. Blasy, Royal Bot Garden Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH3 5LR, Midlothian, United Kingdom (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Midlothian, United Kingdom, Europe, Life Science Research

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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