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New Hela Cells Study Findings Have Been Reported by Investigators at School of Medicine (A microfluidic device for continuous manipulation of...

July 30, 2014



New Hela Cells Study Findings Have Been Reported by Investigators at School of Medicine (A microfluidic device for continuous manipulation of biological cells using dielectrophoresis)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators publish new report on Hela Cells. According to news reporting from Kharagpur, India, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The present study demonstrates the design, simulation, fabrication and testing of a label-free continuous manipulation and separation micro-device of particles/biological cells suspended on medium based on conventional dielectrophoresis. The current dielectrophoretic device uses three planner electrodes to generate non-uniform electric field and induces both p-DEP and n-DEP force simultaneously depending on the dielectric properties of the particles and thus influencing at least two types of particles at a time."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the School of Medicine, "Numerical simulations were performed to predict the distribution of non-uniform electric field, DEP force and particle trajectories. The device is fabricated utilizing the advantage of bonding between PDMS and SUB polymer. The p-DEP particles move away from the center of the streamline, while the n-DEP particles will follow the central streamline along the channel length. Dielectrophoretic effects were initially tested using polystyrene beads followed by manipulation of HeLa cells. In the experiment, it was observed that polystyrene beads in DI water always response as n-DEP up to 1 MHz frequency, whereas HeLa cells in PBS medium response as n-DEP up to 400 kHz frequency and then it experiences p-DEP up to 1 MHz."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Further, the microscopic observations of DEP responses of HeLa cells were verified by performing trapping experiment at static condition."

For more information on this research see: A microfluidic device for continuous manipulation of biological cells using dielectrophoresis. Medical Engineering & Physics, 2014;36(6):726-731. Medical Engineering & Physics can be contacted at: Elsevier Sci Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, Oxon, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Medical Engineering & Physics - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/30456)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting D. Das, Indian Inst Technol, Sch Med Sci & Technol, Kharagpur 721302, W Bengal, India. Additional authors for this research include K. Biswas and S. Das (see also Hela Cells).

Keywords for this news article include: Kharagpur, India, Asia, Hela Cells

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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