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New Findings from University of Cologne in the Area of Nanoparticles Described (Use of metallic nanoparticles to improve the thermophysical...

August 1, 2014



New Findings from University of Cologne in the Area of Nanoparticles Described (Use of metallic nanoparticles to improve the thermophysical properties of organic heat transfer fluids used in concentrated solar power)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Energy Weekly News -- Investigators publish new report on Nanoparticles. According to news reporting from Cologne, Germany, by VerticalNews journalists, research stated, "One of the approaches to enhance the efficiency, and consequently, reduce costs to produce electricity from concentrated solar power (CSP) is by the development of advanced high temperature heat transfer fluids (HTFs). Incorporation of metallic nanoparticles into conventional heat transfer fluids could significantly improve the thermal transport properties of the HTFs."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of Cologne, "This study reports on the synthesis and investigation of copper nanoparticles synthesized in-house and dispersed in two synthetic HTFs Therminol 59 (TH59) and Therminol 66 (TH66). Liquid phase reduction of a copper salt was used to produce copper nanoparticles. Suspensions with various copper nanoparticle loadings (0.5-2 vol.%) were prepared. Characterizations such as the thermal conductivity, dynamic viscosity, mass specific heat capacity, and fluid stability were performed on the suspensions. Thermal conductivity enhancements over the base fluids were as high as approximately 20% at a 2 vol.% particle loading. These enhancements in the thermal conductivity are higher than the predictions based on the Effective Medium Theory (EMT). Dynamic viscosity measurements showed that if good dispersion of nanoparticles is achieved, the composite fluids behave in a Newtonian manner and the dynamic viscosity increases over the base fluid are minor at temperatures 125 C and above. Stability of the suspensions with time was also investigated."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Based on the measured properties of the suspensions, a figure of merit for heat transfer was calculated to evaluate the viability of the suspensions."

For more information on this research see: Use of metallic nanoparticles to improve the thermophysical properties of organic heat transfer fluids used in concentrated solar power. Solar Energy, 2014;105():468-478. Solar Energy can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Solar Energy - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/329)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting D. Singh, University of Cologne, Inst Inorgan Chem, D-50923 Cologne, Germany. Additional authors for this research include E.V. Timofeeva, M.R. Moravek, S. Cingarapu, W.H. Yu, T. Fischer and S. Mathur.

Keywords for this news article include: Cologne, Germany, Europe, Emerging Technologies, Energy, Nanoparticle, Nanoparticles, Nanotechnology, Solar Power

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Energy Weekly News


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