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New Findings from Kobe University in the Area of Biomimetics Described (Combined use of two membrane-potential-sensitive dyes for determination of...

July 30, 2014



New Findings from Kobe University in the Area of Biomimetics Described (Combined use of two membrane-potential-sensitive dyes for determination of the Galvani potential difference across a biomimetic oil/water interface)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators publish new report on Biomimetics. According to news reporting originating in Kobe, Japan, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The fluorescence behavior of anionic membrane-potential-sensitive dyes, bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol (DiBAC4(3)) and bis-(1,3-diethylthiobarbituric acid)trimethine oxonol (DiSBAC2(3)), at a biomimetic 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE)/water (W) interface was studied by the mean of potential-modulated fluorescence (PMF) spectroscopy. The respective dyes gave a well-defined PMF signal due to the adsorption/desorption at the DCE/W interface."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Kobe University, "It was also found that the potentials where the two dyes gave the PMF signals were different by about 100 mV. We then attempted a combined use of the two dyes for determination of the Galvani potential difference across the DCE/W interface. When 40 ?M DiBAC4(3) and 15 ?M DiSBAC2(3) were initially added to the W phase, distinctly different spectra were obtained for different interfacial potentials. The ratio of the PMF signal intensities at 530 and 575 nm (the fluorescence maximum wavelengths for the respective dyes) showed a clear dependence on the interfacial potential."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "These results suggested the potential utility of the combined use of two dyes for the determination of membrane potentials in vivo."

For more information on this research see: Combined use of two membrane-potential-sensitive dyes for determination of the Galvani potential difference across a biomimetic oil/water interface. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2014;406(14):3407-14. (Springer - www.springer.com; Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry - www.springerlink.com/content/1618-2642/)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting T. Yoshimura, Dept. of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, Nada, Kobe, 657-8501, Japan. Additional authors for this research include H. Nagatani and T. Osakai (see also Biomimetics).

Keywords for this news article include: Kobe, Japan, Asia, Bioengineering, Biomimetics, Bionanotechnology, Biotechnology, Emerging Technologies, Nanobiotechnology, Nanotechnology.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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