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Findings in Endothelial Cells Reported from Wake Forest University (Factors Affecting Successful Isolation of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells for...

July 29, 2014



Findings in Endothelial Cells Reported from Wake Forest University (Factors Affecting Successful Isolation of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells for Clinical Use)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Research findings on Endothelial Cells are discussed in a new report. According to news originating from Winston Salem, North Carolina, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Corneal transplantation is a common transplant procedure used to improve visual acuity by replacing the opaque or distorted host tissue with clear healthy donor tissue. However, its clinical utility is limited due to a lack of donor supply of high-quality corneas."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Wake Forest University, "Bioengineered neocorneas, created using an expandable population of human donor-derived corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), could address this shortage. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate HCEC sourcing with various isolation methods, including enzymatic digestion, culture medium components, and adhesive proteins. HCECs were obtained from corneas obtained from various aged donors after endothelial keratoplasty. Under a dissection microscope, the Descemet's membrane, including the attached corneal endothelium, was stripped from the stroma, and the cells were isolated and expanded by explant culture or by enzymatic digestion with enzymes such as collagenase II, dispase, or trypsin. In order to improve the initial cell attachment, tissue culture plates were coated with collagen IV, fibronectin, or fibronectin collagen combination coating mix (FNC) before cell plating. We were able to successfully obtain HCECs from 32% (86/269) of donor corneas. Donor age and isolation method influenced the characteristics of the resulting in vitro HCEC culture. Under all conditions tested, FNC-coated plates showed higher quality cultures than the other coatings tested. These results suggest that donor age and HCEC isolation methodology are the two factors that most directly affect the quality of the resulting HCEC culture in vitro."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "These factors should guide the methodological development for the clinical expansion of HCECs for the generation of bioengineered neocorneas."

For more information on this research see: Factors Affecting Successful Isolation of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells for Clinical Use. Cell Transplantation, 2014;23(7):845-854. Cell Transplantation can be contacted at: Cognizant Communication Corp, 18 Peekskill Hollow Rd, PO Box 37, Putnam Valley, NY 10579, USA (see also Endothelial Cells).

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from J.S. Choi, Wake Forest Sch Med, Dept. of Biostat, Winston Salem, NC 27157, United States. Additional authors for this research include B.Y. Kim, M.J. Kim, F.A. Khan, M. Giegengack, R. D'Agostino, T. Criswell, G. Khang and S. Soker.

Keywords for this news article include: Winston Salem, North Carolina, United States, North and Central America, Endothelial Cells

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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