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Findings from Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research Yields New Findings on Biotechnology (Plant-microbe interactions as drivers of ecosystem...

July 30, 2014



Findings from Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research Yields New Findings on Biotechnology (Plant-microbe interactions as drivers of ecosystem functions relevant for the biodegradation of organic contaminants)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators publish new report on Technology. According to news reporting originating from Leipzig, Germany, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The plant organism and associated microbial communities can be seen as a sunlight driven hotspot for the turnover of organic chemicals. In such environments the fate of a chemical will not only depend on its intrinsic structural stability toward (bio)chemical reactions and its bioavailability but also on the functional effectiveness and stability of natural microbial communities as main drivers of natural attenuation of chemicals."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research, "Recent research demonstrates that interactions between plants and microorganisms are crucial for the biotransformation of organic chemicals, for various processes affecting the bioavailability of such compounds, and for the stability of the affected ecosystem. Practical bioremediation approaches, therefore, should encompass integrated measures targeting functional vegetation as well as functional microbial communities. Good examples for a successful practical approach are constructed wetlands, where an artificial, simplified ecosystem is used for the detoxification of organic contaminants. While such systems have considerable practical success, they are often treated as a black box and a sound mechanistic understanding of functional resilience and of the 'reactive power' of such plant-microbe ecosystems is poor."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This situation has to change, if progress in the application of bioremediation is to be made."

For more information on this research see: Plant-microbe interactions as drivers of ecosystem functions relevant for the biodegradation of organic contaminants. Current Opinion in Biotechnology, 2014;27():168-175. Current Opinion in Biotechnology can be contacted at: Current Biology Ltd, 84 Theobalds Rd, London WC1X 8RR, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Current Opinion in Biotechnology - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/601293)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting T. Fester, UFZ Helmholtz Center Environm Res, D-04318 Leipzig, Germany. Additional authors for this research include J. Giebler, L.Y. Wick, D. Schlosser and M. Kastner (see also Technology).

Keywords for this news article include: Leipzig, Germany, Europe, Chemicals, Chemistry, Technology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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