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Findings from Central China Normal University Provides New Data on Environmental Water Research [Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires enhanced Fenton...

July 29, 2014



Findings from Central China Normal University Provides New Data on Environmental Water Research [Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires enhanced Fenton oxidation by accelerating the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycles]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- New research on Environmental Water Research is the subject of a report. According to news reporting originating in Wuhan, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "In this study we demonstrate Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires can improve Fenton oxidation efficiency by two times with rhodamine B as a model pollutant at pH > 4. Active species trapping experiments revealed that the rhodamine B oxidation enhancement was attributed to molecular oxygen activation induced by Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires. The molecular oxygen activation process could generate superoxide radicals to assist iron core for the reduction of ferric ions to accelerate the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycles, which favored the H2O2 decomposition to produce more hydroxyl radicals for the rhodamine B oxidation."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Central China Normal University, "The combination of Fe@Fe2O3 core shell nanowires and ferrous ions (Fe@Fe2O3/Fe2+) offered a superior Fenton catalyst to decompose H2O2 for producing (OH)-O-center dot. We employed benzoic acid as a probe reagent to check the generation of (OH)-O-center dot and found the (OH)-O-center dot generation rate of Fe@Fe2O3/Fe2+ was 2-4 orders of magnitude larger than those of commonly used iron based Fenton catalysts and 38 times that of Fe2+. The reusability and the stability of Fe@Fe2O3 core shell nanowires were studied. Total organic carbon and ion chromatography analyses revealed the mineralization of rhodamine B and the releasing of nitrate ions. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry was used to investigate the degradation intermediates to propose the possible rhodamine B Fenton oxidation pathway in the presence of Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "This study not only provides a new Fenton oxidation system for pollutant control, but also widen the application of molecular oxygen activation induced by nanoscale zero valent iron."

For more information on this research see: Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires enhanced Fenton oxidation by accelerating the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycles. Water Research, 2014;59():145-153. Water Research can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Water Research - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/309)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J.G. Shi, Cent China Normal Univ, Inst Environm Chem, Key Lab Pesticide & Chem Biol, Coll ChemMinist Educ, Wuhan 430079, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include Z.H. Ai and L.Z. Zhang (see also Environmental Water Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Wuhan, People's Republic of China, Asia, Environmental Water Research

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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