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Study Data from Leiden University Update Knowledge of Oxides (Spare the details, share the relevance: The dilution effect in communications about...

July 8, 2014



Study Data from Leiden University Update Knowledge of Oxides (Spare the details, share the relevance: The dilution effect in communications about carbon dioxide capture and storage)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Oxides. According to news reporting originating from Leiden, Netherlands, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The mitigation of climate change may require the implementation of carbon dioxide capture and storage technology (CCS). Both proponents and opponents of CCS will try to convince the public of the (dis) advantages of this technology."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Leiden University, "This research examines the relative persuasiveness of communications that only contain highly relevant information (e.g., the argument that the implementation of CCS would have important climate benefits) or combine highly relevant with irrelevant or moderately relevant information. The results of three experiments consistently show that adding irrelevant information dilutes the impact of highly relevant information: Irrelevant information reduced the persuasiveness of communications (Experiments 1 and 2) and weakened people's beliefs about the issue (Experiment 3). This dilution effect occurred with both positive (pro-CCS) information and negative (con-CCS) information, but the effect was stronger with positive information. Awareness of the source of the communications moderated the dilution effect."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Implications for public communications about CCS are discussed."

For more information on this research see: Spare the details, share the relevance: The dilution effect in communications about carbon dioxide capture and storage. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 2014;38():116-123. Journal of Environmental Psychology can be contacted at: Academic Press Ltd- Elsevier Science Ltd, 24-28 Oval Rd, London NW1 7DX, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Journal of Environmental Psychology - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/622872)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting G. de Vries, Leiden University, Dept. of Social & Organization Psychol, NL-2300 RA Leiden, Netherlands. Additional authors for this research include B.W. Terwel and N. Ellemers (see also Oxides).

Keywords for this news article include: Leiden, Europe, Chemicals, Chemistry, Technology, Netherlands, Carbon Dioxide, Inorganic Carbon Compounds

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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