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Studies in the Area of Proteobacteria Reported from National Institute of Technology (Microbial diversity, community composition and metabolic...

July 8, 2014



Studies in the Area of Proteobacteria Reported from National Institute of Technology (Microbial diversity, community composition and metabolic potential in hydrocarbon contaminated oily sludge: prospects for in situ bioremediation)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Research findings on Proteobacteria are discussed in a new report. According to news originating from Durgapur, India, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Microbial community composition and metabolic potential have been explored in petroleum-hydrocarbon-contaminated sludge of an oil storage facility. Culture-independent clone library-based 16S rRNA gene analyses revealed that the bacterial community within the sludge was dominated by the members of beta-Proteobacteria (35 %), followed by Firmicutes (13 %), delta-Proteobacteria (11 %), Bacteroidetes (10 %), Acidobacteria (6 %), alpha-Proteobacteria (3 %), Lentisphaerae (2 %), Spirochaetes (2 %), and unclassified bacteria (5 %), whereas the archaeal community was composed of Thermoprotei (54 %), Methanocellales (33 %), Methanosarcinales/Methanosaeta (8 %) and Methanoculleus (1 %) members."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the National Institute of Technology, "Methyl coenzyme M reductase A (mcrA) gene (a functional biomarker) analyses also revealed predominance of hydrogenotrophic, methanogenic Archaea (Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales and Methanoculleus members) over acetoclastic methanogens (Methanosarcinales members). In order to explore the cultivable bacterial population, a total of 28 resident strains were identified and characterized in terms of their physiological and metabolic capabilities. Most of these could be taxonomically affiliated to the members of the genera Bacillus, Paenibacillus, Micrococcus, Brachybacterium, Aerococcus, and Zimmermannella, while two strains were identified as Pseudomonas and Pseudoxanthomonas. Metabolic profiling exhibited that majority of these isolates were capable of growing in presence of a variety of petroleum hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon, tolerating different heavy metals at higher concentrations (>= 1 mM) and producing biosurfactant during growth. Many strains could grow under a wide range of pH, temperature, or salinity as well as under anaerobic conditions in the presence of different electron acceptors and donors in the growth medium. Correlation between the isolates and their metabolic properties was estimated by the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analysis."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Overall observation indicated the presence of diverse groups of microorganisms including hydrocarbonoclastic, nitrate reducing, sulphate reducing, fermentative, syntrophic, methanogenic and methane-oxidizing bacteria and Archaea within the sludge community, which can be exploited for in situ bioremediation of the oily sludge."

For more information on this research see: Microbial diversity, community composition and metabolic potential in hydrocarbon contaminated oily sludge: prospects for in situ bioremediation. Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 2014;21(12):7369-7389. Environmental Science and Pollution Research can be contacted at: Springer Heidelberg, Tiergartenstrasse 17, D-69121 Heidelberg, Germany. (Springer - www.springer.com; Environmental Science and Pollution Research - www.springerlink.com/content/0944-1344/)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from R. Das, Natl Inst Technol, Dept. of Biotechnol, Durgapur 713209, W Bengal, India (see also Proteobacteria).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, India, Durgapur, Hydrocarbons, Proteobacteria, Organic Chemicals

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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