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Studies from University of Southampton Update Current Data on Stem Cells (Harnessing nanotopography and integrin-matrix interactions to influence...

July 7, 2014



Studies from University of Southampton Update Current Data on Stem Cells (Harnessing nanotopography and integrin-matrix interactions to influence stem cell fate)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Stem Cell Week -- Research findings on Stem Cell Research are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting from Southampton, United Kingdom, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Stem cells respond to nanoscale surface features, with changes in cell growth and differentiation mediated by alterations in cell adhesion."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of Southampton, "The interaction of nanotopographical features with integrin receptors in the cells' focal adhesions alters how the cells adhere to materials surfaces, and defines cell fate through changes in both cell biochemistry and cell morphology. In this Review, we discuss how cell adhesions interact with nanotopography, and we provide insight as to how materials scientists can exploit these interactions to direct stem cell fate and to understand how the behaviour of stem cells in their niche can be controlled."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "We expect knowledge gained from the study of cell-nanotopography interactions to accelerate the development of next-generation stem cell culture materials and implant interfaces, and to fuel discovery of stem cell therapeutics to support regenerative therapies."

For more information on this research see: Harnessing nanotopography and integrin-matrix interactions to influence stem cell fate. Nature Materials, 2014;13(6):558-569. Nature Materials can be contacted at: Nature Publishing Group, Macmillan Building, 4 Crinan St, London N1 9XW, England. (Nature Publishing Group - www.nature.com/; Nature Materials - www.nature.com/nmat/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M.J. Dalby, University of Southampton, Inst Dev Sci, Center Human Dev Stem Cells & Regenerat, Bone & Joint Res Grp, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, United Kingdom. Additional authors for this research include N. Gadegaard and R.O.C. Oreffo (see also Stem Cell Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Integrins, Southampton, United Kingdom, Membrane Proteins, Stem Cell Research, Immunologic Receptors

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Stem Cell Week


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