News Column

Researchers from University of Missouri Describe Findings in Colloids and Interface Science (Resveratrol-loaded nanocarriers: Formulation,...

July 8, 2014



Researchers from University of Missouri Describe Findings in Colloids and Interface Science (Resveratrol-loaded nanocarriers: Formulation, optimization, characterization and in vitro toxicity on cochlear cells)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Technology -- New research on Colloids and Interface Science is the subject of a report. According to news reporting originating in Kansas City, Missouri, by VerticalNews journalists, research stated, "The present work aimed to investigate the suitability of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with resveratrol (RES) for drug delivery to cochlear cells. RES-loaded NPs were prepared by a solvent-diffusion method without surfactant."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Missouri, "The Box-Behnken design was used to study the effect of the formulation variables on the particle mean diameter (PMD), polydispersity index (PDI), zeta-potential (zeta), percent drug encapsulation efficiency (EE%), and ratio between NP size before and after freeze-drying (S-f/S-i). The physicochemical stability of the RES-loaded NPs during freeze-drying was investigated using four well-known cryoprotectants (i.e., lactose, mannitol, sucrose, and trehalose) at different concentrations. The RES-loaded NPs were also characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and in vitro drug release studies. Finally, the in vitro toxicity of the synthesized NPs was evaluated on two cochlear cell lines: HEI-OC1 and SVK-1 cells. The optimal formulation (desirability: 0.86) had 135.5 +/- 37.3 nm as PMD, 0.126 +/- 0.080 as PDI, 26.84 +/- 3.31 mV as zeta, 99.83 +/- 17.59% as EE%, and 3.30 +/- 0.92 as S-f/S-i ratio. The PMD and PDI of the RES-loaded NPs were maintained within the model space only when trehalose was used at concentrations higher than 15% (w/v). Results from the in vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that blank NPs did not alter the viability of both cells lines, except for concentrations higher than 600 mu g/mL. However, the cell viability was significantly decreased at high concentrations of native RES (>50 mu M, p< 0.05) in both cell lines."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Overall, the results suggested that the RES-loaded polymeric NPs could be a suitable template for cochlea antioxidant delivery and otoproctection."

For more information on this research see: Resveratrol-loaded nanocarriers: Formulation, optimization, characterization and in vitro toxicity on cochlear cells. Colloids and Surfaces B-Biointerfaces, 2014;118():234-242. Colloids and Surfaces B-Biointerfaces can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting U.M. Musazzi, University of Missouri, Dept. of Geosci, Kansas City, MO 64110, United States. Additional authors for this research include I. Youm, J.B. Murowchick, M.J. Ezoulin and B.B.C. Youan.

Keywords for this news article include: Missouri, Kansas City, United States, North and Central America, Colloids and Interface Science

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Journal of Technology


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters