News Column

Researchers from University of Georgia Describe Findings in Metallomics (Metallomics of two microorganisms relevant to heavy metal bioremediation...

July 9, 2014



Researchers from University of Georgia Describe Findings in Metallomics (Metallomics of two microorganisms relevant to heavy metal bioremediation reveal fundamental differences in metal assimilation and utilization)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Current study results on Metallomics have been published. According to news originating from Athens, Georgia, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Although as many as half of all proteins are thought to require a metal cofactor, the metalloproteomes of microorganisms remain relatively unexplored. Microorganisms from different environments are likely to vary greatly in the metals that they assimilate, not just among the metals with well-characterized roles but also those lacking any known function."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Georgia, "Herein we investigated the metal utilization of two microorganisms that were isolated from very similar environments and are of interest because of potential roles in the immobilization of heavy metals, such as uranium and chromium. The metals assimilated and their concentrations in the cytoplasm of Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough (DvH) and Enterobacter cloacae strain Hanford (EcH) varied dramatically, with a larger number of metals present in Enterobacter. For example, a total of 9 and 19 metals were assimilated into their cytoplasmic fractions, respectively, and DvH did not assimilate significant amounts of zinc or copper whereas EcH assimilated both. However, bioinformatic analysis of their genome sequences revealed a comparable number of predicted metalloproteins, 813 in DvH and 953 in EcH. These allowed some rationalization of the types of metal assimilated in some cases (Fe, Cu, Mo, W, V) but not in others (Zn, Nd, Ce, Pr, Dy, Hf and Th)."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "It was also shown that U binds an unknown soluble protein in EcH but this incorporation was the result of extracellular U binding to cytoplasmic components after cell lysis."

For more information on this research see: Metallomics of two microorganisms relevant to heavy metal bioremediation reveal fundamental differences in metal assimilation and utilization. Metallomics, 2014;6(5):1004-13. (Royal Society of Chemistry - www.rsc.org/; Metallomics - pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/journalissues/mt)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from W.A. Lancaster, Dept. of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Life Sciences Bldg, Athens, GA 30602-7229, United States. Additional authors for this research include A.L. Menon, I. Scott, F.L. Poole, B.J. Vaccaro, M.P. Thorgersen, J. Geller, T.C. Hazen, R.A. Hurt, S.D. Brown, D.A. Elias and M.W Adams (see also Metallomics).

Keywords for this news article include: Athens, Georgia, Metallomics, United States, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Biotech Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters