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Researchers from Institute of Structural Biology Provide Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of Fullerenes [Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase...

July 8, 2014



Researchers from Institute of Structural Biology Provide Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of Fullerenes [Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity modulation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and ...]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Fresh data on Fullerenes are presented in a new report. According to news reporting out of Neuherberg, Germany, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "The increase in commercial production and inevitable release of fullerenes into the environment accelerates concerns about their potential toxicity. Furthermore, the concomitant release of xenobiotics poses a health hazard to humans, and might present potential long-term risks to human health."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the Institute of Structural Biology, "In the present study, we found that an aqueous suspension of buckminsterfullerene (aqu-nC60) does not result in the induction of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in H4IIE rat liver cells in vitro. The simultaneous and sequential exposure of aqu-nC60 and the dioxin TCDD induces EROD activity to the same extent as TCDD alone (i.e. in the absence of fullerene), in spite of the high affinity of C60 for TCDD. However, the co-exposure of aqu-nC60 and PCB 126 induces elevated EROD activity, and sequential exposure increases responses 2-fold compared to the control samples."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Our in vitro observations suggest a potential source of drug-drug type interaction of fullerene with xenobiotics, particularly after a sequential exposure."

For more information on this research see: Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity modulation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) in the presence of aqueous suspensions of nano-C60. Alternatives To Laboratory Animals, 2014;42(1):71-80. Alternatives To Laboratory Animals can be contacted at: Frame, Russell & Burch House 96-98 North Sherwood St, Nottingham NG1 4EE, Notts, England (see also Fullerenes).

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting R. Rathore, Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Munchen - German Research Centre for Environmental Health (GmbH), Molecular Exposomics, Neuherberg, Germany.

Publisher contact information for the journal Alternatives To Laboratory Animals is: Frame, Russell & Burch House 96-98 North Sherwood St, Nottingham NG1 4EE, Notts, England.

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Germany, Neuherberg, Fullerenes, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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