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Researchers at Wake Forest University Report New Data on Integrative Biology (Sphingolipid metabolites modulate dielectric characteristics of cells...

July 8, 2014



Researchers at Wake Forest University Report New Data on Integrative Biology (Sphingolipid metabolites modulate dielectric characteristics of cells in a mouse ovarian cancer progression model)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Life Science Research. According to news originating from Blacksburg, Virginia, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Currently, conventional cancer treatment regimens often rely upon highly toxic chemotherapeutics or target oncogenes that are variably expressed within the heterogeneous cell population of tumors. These challenges highlight the need for novel treatment strategies that (1) are non-toxic yet able to at least partially reverse the aggressive phenotype of the disease to a benign or very slow-growing state, and (2) act on the cells independently of variably expressed biomarkers."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Wake Forest University, "Using a label-independent rapid microfluidic cell manipulation strategy known as contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP), we investigated the effect of non-toxic concentrations of two bioactive sphingolipid metabolites, sphingosine (So), with potential anti-tumor properties, and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a tumor-promoting metabolite, on the intrinsic electrical properties of early and late stages of mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cancer cells. Previously, we demonstrated that electrical properties change as cells progress from a benign early stage to late malignant stages. Here, we demonstrate an association between So treatment and a shift in the bioelectrical characteristics of late stage MOSE (MOSE-L) cells towards a profile similar to that of benign MOSE-E cells. Particularly, the specific membrane capacitance of MOSE-L cells shifted toward that of MOSE-E cells, decreasing from 23.94 2.75 to 16.46 0.62 mF m(-2) after So treatment, associated with a decrease in membrane protrusions. In contrast, S1P did not reverse the electrical properties of MOSE-L cells. This work is the first to indicate that treatment with non-toxic doses of So correlates with changes in the electrical properties and surface roughness of cells."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "It also demonstrates the potential of cDEP to be used as a new, rapid technique for drug efficacy studies, and for eventually designing more personalized treatment regimens."

For more information on this research see: Sphingolipid metabolites modulate dielectric characteristics of cells in a mouse ovarian cancer progression model. Integrative Biology, 2013;5(6):843-52. (Royal Society of Chemistry - www.rsc.org/; Integrative Biology - pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/journalissues/ib)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from A. Salmanzadeh, Bioelectromechanical Systems Laboratory, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, United States. Additional authors for this research include E.S. Elvington, P.C. Roberts, E.M. Schmelz and R.V Davalos (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Cancer, Virginia, Oncology, Blacksburg, United States, Life Science Research, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Cancer Weekly


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