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Researchers at Newcastle University Report Findings in Tissue Engineering (Novel resorbable glass-ceramic scaffolds for hard tissue engineering: from...

July 9, 2014



Researchers at Newcastle University Report Findings in Tissue Engineering (Novel resorbable glass-ceramic scaffolds for hard tissue engineering: from the parent phosphate glass to its bone-like macroporous derivatives)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering. According to news reporting originating from Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "One of the major challenges of hard tissue engineering research focuses on the development of scaffolds that can match the mechanical properties of the host bone and resorb at the same rate as the bone is repaired. The aim of this work was the synthesis and characterization of a resorbable phosphate glass, as well as its application for the fabrication of three dimensional (3-D) scaffolds for bone regeneration."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Newcastle University, "The glass microstructure and behaviour upon heating were analysed by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and hot stage microscopy. The glass solubility was investigated according to relevant ISO standards using distilled water, simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-HCl as testing media. The glass underwent progressive dissolution over time in all three media but the formation of a hydroxyapatite-like layer was also observed on the samples soaked in SBF and Tris-HCl, which demonstrated the bioactivity of the material. The glass powder was used to fabricate 3-D macroporous bone-like glass-ceramic scaffolds by adopting polyethylene particles as pore formers: during thermal treatment, the polymer additive was removed and the sintering of glass particles was allowed. The obtained scaffolds exhibited high porosity (87 vol.%) and compressive strength around 1.5 MPa. After soaking for 4 months in SBF, the scaffolds mass loss was 76 wt.% and the pH of the solution did not exceed the 7.55 value, thereby remaining in a physiological range."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The produced scaffolds, being resorbable, bioactive, architecturally similar to trabecular bone and exhibiting interesting mechanical properties, can be proposed as promising candidates for bone repair applications."

For more information on this research see: Novel resorbable glass-ceramic scaffolds for hard tissue engineering: from the parent phosphate glass to its bone-like macroporous derivatives. Journal of Biomaterials Applications, 2014;28(9):1287-303. (Sage Publications - www.sagepub.com/; Journal of Biomaterials Applications - jba.sagepub.com)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting O. Bretcanu, 1School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. Additional authors for this research include F. Baino, E. Verne and C. Vitale-Brovarone (see also Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering).

Keywords for this news article include: Tissue Engineering, Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, Europe, Anions, Phosphates, Bone Research, United Kingdom, Bioengineering, Phosphoric Acids, Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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