News Column

New Stem Cells Findings from Yamaguchi University Discussed (Haemodynamic unloading increases the survival and affects the differentiation of cardiac...

July 9, 2014



New Stem Cells Findings from Yamaguchi University Discussed (Haemodynamic unloading increases the survival and affects the differentiation of cardiac stem cells after implantation into an infarcted heart)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- New research on Stem Cell Research is the subject of a report. According to news reporting from Yamaguchi, Japan, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "It has been anticipated that stem cell therapy is capable of repairing an injured heart but is currently limited by its marginal efficacy. We believe that mechanical stress due to haemodynamic loading may negate the therapeutic potency of stem cells and therefore investigated how haemodynamic unloading affects the survival and differentiation of stem cells after implantation into an infarcted heart."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Yamaguchi University, "A left ventricular (LV) haemodynamic unloading model was implemented by heterotopic transplantation of an infarcted donor heart into another healthy mouse. An in situ infarcted heart with general haemodynamic loading was used as control. A total of 5 million cardiac stem cells expanded from green fluorescence protein (GFP)-transgenic mouse were intramyocardially implanted into the infarcted LVs of haemodynamically unloaded donor heart or general haemodynamic loaded heart. The survival and differentiation of the implanted cardiac stem cells were evaluated by histological analyses at 3 and 21 days after cell implantation (n = 5-6 in each time points per group). Compared with the general haemodynamic loading condition, haemodynamic unloading of the infarcted hearts significantly improved the survival, increased the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of cardiac stem cells at 21 days after cell implantation (P < 0.05). In addition, the number of GFP(+)/Sca-1(+) cells was much higher in the unloaded hearts than in the loaded hearts at 21 days after cell implantation, although the difference was not statistically significant (5.67 +/- 5.10 vs 0.75 +/- 0.50, P = 0.051). Among the surviving GFP(+) donor cells 21 days after implantation, the expressions of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, smooth muscle actin and sarcomeric alpha actin were similar to 7, 38 and 27% in the loaded heart and similar to 19, 14 and 55% in the unloaded heart, respectively. Haemodynamic unloading favours the survival/engraftment of donor stem cells and affects their differentiation after implantation into an infarcted heart."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Although further studies in a large animal model are required to investigate the functional benefits of haemodynamic unloading on stem cell therapy, we may temporarily unload the damaged heart to enhance cell engraftment and then load the heart again to induce the differentiation of stem cells."

For more information on this research see: Haemodynamic unloading increases the survival and affects the differentiation of cardiac stem cells after implantation into an infarcted heart. European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, 2014;45(6):976-982. European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery can be contacted at: Oxford Univ Press Inc, Journals Dept, 2001 Evans Rd, Cary, NC 27513, USA. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/600127)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting H. Kurazumi, Yamaguchi University, Inst Lab Anim, Yamaguchi, Japan. Additional authors for this research include T.S. Li, Y. Takemoto, R. Suzuki, A. Mikamo, C.Y. Guo, T. Murata and K. Hamano (see also Stem Cell Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Japan, Yamaguchi, Cardiology, Stem Cell Research

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Biotech Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters