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New Findings from Natural History Museum Update Understanding of Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology (3D Geometry and Quantitative Variation...

July 8, 2014



New Findings from Natural History Museum Update Understanding of Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology (3D Geometry and Quantitative Variation of the Cervico-Thoracic Region in Crocodylia)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Data detailed on Life Science Research have been presented. According to news originating from Los Angeles, California, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "This study aims to interpret the axial patterning of the crocodylian neck, and to find a potential taxonomic signal that corresponds to vertebral position. Morphological variation in the cervico-thoracic vertebrae is compared in fifteen different crocodylian species using 3D geometric morphometric methods."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Natural History Museum, "Multivariate analysis indicated that the pattern of intracolumnar variation was a gradual change in shape of the vertebral series (at the parapophyses, diapophyses, prezygapohyses, and postzygapohyses), in the cervical (C3 to C9) and dorsal (D1-D2) regions which was quite conservative among the crocodylians studied. In spite of this, we also found that intracolumnar shape variation allowed differentiation between two sub regions of the crocodylian neck. Growth is subtly correlated with vertebral shape variation, predicting changes in both the vertebral centrum and the neural spine. Interestingly, the allometric scaling for the pooled sample is equivalently shared by each vertebra studied. However, there were significant taxonomic differences, both in the average shape of the entire neck configuration (regional variation) and by shape variation at each vertebral position (positional variation) among the necks. The average neck vertebra of crocodylids is characterized by a relatively cranio-caudally short neural arch, whereby the spine is relatively longer and pointed orthogonal to the frontal plane. Conversely, the average vertebra in alligatorids has cranio-caudally longer neural spine and arch, with a relatively (dorso-ventrally) shorter spine. At each vertebral position there are significant differences between alligatorids and crocodylids."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "We discuss that the delayed timing of neurocentral fusion in Alligatoridae possibly explains the observed taxonomic differences."

For more information on this research see: 3D Geometry and Quantitative Variation of the Cervico-Thoracic Region in Crocodylia. Anatomical Record-Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology, 2014;297(7):1278-1291. Anatomical Record-Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA (see also Life Science Research).

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from B. Chamero, Nat Hist Museum Los Angeles Cty, Dinosaur Inst, Los Angeles, CA, United States. Additional authors for this research include A.D. Buscalioni, J. Marugan-Lobon and I. Sarris.

Keywords for this news article include: California, Los Angeles, United States, Life Science Research, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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