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Findings on Epithelial Cells Discussed by A.L. Armstead and Co-Researchers [Exploring the potential role of tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co)...

July 11, 2014



Findings on Epithelial Cells Discussed by A.L. Armstead and Co-Researchers [Exploring the potential role of tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticle internalization in observed toxicity toward lung epithelial cells in vitro]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Drug Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Epithelial Cells. According to news reporting originating from Morgantown, West Virginia, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) has been recognized as a workplace inhalation hazard in the manufacturing, mining and drilling industries by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. Exposure to WC-Co is known to cause 'hard metal lung disease' but the relationship between exposure, toxicity and development of disease remain poorly understood."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research, "To better understand this relationship, the present study examined the role of WC-Co particle size and internalization on toxicity using lung epithelial cells. We demonstrated that nano-and micro-WC-Co particles exerted toxicity in a dose-and time-dependent manner and that nano-WC-Co particles caused significantly greater toxicity at lower concentrations and shorter exposure times compared to micro-WC-Co particles. WC-Co particles in the nano-size range (not micron-sized) were internalized by lung epithelial cells, which suggested that internalization may play a key role in the enhanced toxicity of nano-WC-Co particles over micro-WC-Co particles. Further exploration of the internalization process indicated that there may be multiple mechanisms involved in WC-Co internalization such as actin and microtubule based cytoskeletal rearrangements."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "These findings support our hypothesis that WC-Co particle internalization contributes to cellular toxicity and suggest that therapeutic treatments inhibiting particle internalization may serve as prophylactic approaches for those at risk of WC-Co particle exposure."

For more information on this research see: Exploring the potential role of tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticle internalization in observed toxicity toward lung epithelial cells in vitro. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 2014;278(1):1-8. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology can be contacted at: Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science, 525 B St, Ste 1900, San Diego, CA 92101-4495, USA. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/622951)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A.L. Armstead, Mary Babb Randolph Canc Center, Morgantown, WV 26506, United States. Additional authors for this research include C.B. Arena and B.Y. Li (see also Epithelial Cells).

Keywords for this news article include: Cobalt, Chemicals, Chemistry, Morgantown, Heavy Metals, West Virginia, United States, Epithelial Cells, Tungsten Carbide, Transition Elements, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Drug Week


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