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University of Sheffield Reports Findings in Biomaterials (Simplifying corneal surface regeneration using a biodegradable synthetic membrane and...

July 22, 2014



University of Sheffield Reports Findings in Biomaterials (Simplifying corneal surface regeneration using a biodegradable synthetic membrane and limbal tissue explants)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Technology -- Current study results on Biomaterials have been published. According to news reporting from Sheffield, United Kingdom, by VerticalNews journalists, research stated, "Currently, damage to the ocular surface can be repaired by transferring laboratory cultured limbal epithelial cells (LECs) to the cornea using donor human amniotic membrane as the cell carrier. We describe the development of a synthetic biodegradable membrane of Poly D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) with a 50:50 ratio of lactide and glycolide for the delivery of both isolated LECs and of cells grown out from limbal tissue explants."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of Sheffield, "Both isolated LECs and limbal explants produced confluent limbal cultures within 2 weeks of culture on the membranes without the need for fibroblast feeder layers. Outgrowth of cells from explants was promoted by the inclusion of fibrin. Membranes with cells on them broke down predictably within 4-6 weeks in vitro and the breakdown was faster for a lower molecular weight (MW) (44 kg/mol) rather than a higher MW (153 kg/mol) PLGA. Membranes could be reproducibly produced, sterilised with gamma irradiation and stored dry at -20 C for at least 12 months, and the ability to support cell outgrowth from explants was retained. We demonstrate transfer of cells (both isolated LECs and of cells grown out from limbal explants) from the membranes to an ex vivo rabbit cornea model. Characterisations of the cells by immunohistochemistry showed both differentiated and stem cell populations."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "A synthetic membrane combined with limbal explants in theatre would avoid the need for tissue banked human amniotic membrane and also avoid the need for specialist laboratory facilities for LEC expansion making this more accessible to many more surgeons and patients."

For more information on this research see: Simplifying corneal surface regeneration using a biodegradable synthetic membrane and limbal tissue explants. Biomaterials, 2013;34(21):5088-106. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biomaterials - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/30392)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting P. Deshpande, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Kroto Research Institute, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. Additional authors for this research include C. Ramachandran, F. Sefat, I. Mariappan, C. Johnson, R. McKean, M. Hannah, V.S. Sangwan, F. Claeyssens, A.J. Ryan and S. MacNeil.

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Sheffield, Biomaterials, United Kingdom.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Journal of Technology


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