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Study Results from National Research Council of Canada Broaden Understanding of Materials Science (Superhydrophobic Stability of Nanotube Array...

July 22, 2014



Study Results from National Research Council of Canada Broaden Understanding of Materials Science (Superhydrophobic Stability of Nanotube Array Surfaces under Impact and Static Forces)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Technology -- New research on Materials Science is the subject of a report. According to news reporting out of Ottawa, Canada, by VerticalNews editors, research stated, "The surfaces of nanotube arrays were coated with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using an imprinting method with an anodized alumina membrane as the template. The prepared nanotube array surfaces then either remained untreated or were coated with NH2(CH2)(3)Si(OCH3)(3)(PDNS) or CF3(CF2)(7)CH2CH2Si(OC2H5)(3) (PFO)."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the National Research Council of Canada, "Thus, nanotube arrays with three different surfaces, PDNS, PMMA (without coating), and PFO, were obtained. All three surfaces (PDNS, PMMA, and PFO) exhibited superhydrophobic properties with contact angles (CA) of 155, 166, and 168 degrees, respectively, and their intrinsic water contact angles were 30, 79, and 118 degrees, respectively. The superhydrophobic stabilities of these three surfaces were examined under dynamic impact and static pressures in terms of the transition from the Cassie-Baxter mode to the Wenzel mode. This transition was determined by the maximum pressure (p(max)), which is dependent on the intrinsic contact angle and the nanotube density of the surface. A p(max) greater than 10 kPa, which is sufficiently large to maintain stable superhydrophobicity under extreme weather conditions, such as in heavy rain, was expected from the PFO surface. Interestingly, the PDNS surface, with an intrinsic CA of only 30, also displayed superhydrophobicity, with a CA of 155 degrees. This property was partially maintained under the dynamic impact and static pressure tests. However, under an extremely high pressure (0.5 MPa), all three surfaces transitioned from the Cassie-Baxter mode to the Wenzel mode. Furthermore, the lost superhydrophobicity could not be recovered by simply relieving the pressure."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This result indicates that the best way to maintain superhydrophobicity is to increase the p(max) of the surface to a value higher than the applied external pressure by using low surface energy materials and having high-density binary nano-/microstructures on the surface."

For more information on this research see: Superhydrophobic Stability of Nanotube Array Surfaces under Impact and Static Forces. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 2014;6(11):8073-8079. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/aamick)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting L. Zhu, Natl Res Council Canada, Secur & Disrupt Technol, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6, Canada. Additional authors for this research include P. Shi, J. Xue, Y.Y. Wang, Q.M. Chen, J.F. Ding and Q.J. Wang.

Keywords for this news article include: Ottawa, Canada, Ontario, Materials Science, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Journal of Technology


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